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80 409 Urban preservasjon

Emnenavn på English: 
Urban transformation
Studiepoeng: 
6
Emnekode: 
80 409
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
15
Emneansvarlig
Tom Davies
Forkunnskapskrav

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Om emnet

The urban landscape of Norwegian cities and towns is changing, so is the valuation of historical buildings and neighborhoods. The current urge for progress in the form of compact cities, planned to handle a substantial population growth, puts pressure on the existing urban fabric. In parallel with that, however, the ongoing ‘green shift’, with its emphasis on sustainability, urban denseness and energy-friendly solutions, also comes with a renewed understanding of the built environment as part of the green wave. Demolition is not always optimal from an energy perspective, especially not if historical buildings are handled, re-used and re-cycled in skillful and creative ways. Urban structures of the past can also boost social sustainability and strengthen neighborhood identity, potentially in dialogue with new additions.

For this reason, architects and planners will increasingly be asked to handle historical material in the future. An architectural brief very seldom comes without a historical perspective of some kind. Consequently, more knowledge is needed in order to manage this interesting challenge in practice. This course seeks to define and develop precisely that competence, primarily at an urban scale, through theoretical studies and practical assignments. The main question is: How can one reflect history and direct the future in one coherent process?

The aim of this course is to explore this question by studying various forms of preservation theories and cultural heritage strategies in relation to urban planning theory and practice. Experimental preservation is a key term in this respect, as is community work – to seek the engagement of local residents in order to improve social and spatial conditions within a given environment.

 

This term’s project looks at the morphological development of Oslo’s St Olav’s Plass and explores its sense of ‘community’ through those who live, work and use this definable ‘place’ in Central Oslo today. This traces its development since the 19th Century through to the late 20th Century additions which define its character today. The primary targets for investigation are the angular concrete Erling Viksjø and Inger A Dahl’s Domus Nova (1969) and Nils Holter’s Universitetsgata 2, (1962 & 71), the arguably Brutalist late arrivals who crashed the party at St Olav’s in the 1960s. We will use a combination of historical study and live community engagement, to understand the both ‘place’ and the relationships of people who live, work and move in St Olav’s Plass today, as a sense of fluid community.   

Archival research and maps and photographs will be used to understand St Olav’s Plass as a whole. This will be developed through community engagement (taught on the course) into a small pop-up exhibition about St Olav’s Plass, which will help to further engage with visitors and workers and the understanding of community relationships. Key in this will be uncovering whether and what type of tangible sense of community there is, insights into the relationships people have to the different aspects of the space (particularly DM & U2), and contributing to the identity of SOP through the project by providing the opportunity to discuss and raise its profile.

The approach behind this is drawn from a heritage narrative method being developed by Tom Davies (teacher) which will form part of the taught component. Students will learn about current value-based heritage work, how as practitioners we can engage with people and place. Course content will include architectural and planning background through Brutalist/Structuralist notions such as ‘As Found’ from Team X, Candilis-Josic-Woods to Christian Norberg-Schultz’ Genus Loci and more. Attention will also be given to the philosophy of habitat developed by Michel Foucault, Henri Lefebvre and Paul-Henry Chombart De Lauwe and other thinkers in this. The aim in this is to help the students to understand how today’s sustainability based planning emerged and how we can better work with communities through it.

Læringsutbytte

The students will gain insights into current debates on urban preservation, with a particular emphasis on the Norwegian discourse. This involves a basic understanding of bureaucratic systems, political processes, laws and regulations, yet also the possibility to think beyond established rules and doctrines. The idea is to bridge theory and practice by mixing a critical reflection on the value of urban history with addressing urgent needs in the contemporary city through project-based output.

The students will achieve hands-on experience in how to perform urban preservation, through sketching out cultural heritage plans and processing relevant data. They will learn how to conduct field work, how to process data and prepare a strategic urban plan, with the aim of harnessing historical material with a future-oriented outcome. This involves working with local stakeholders, such as municipal offices, entrepreneurs and regular citizens.

This year's edition of the course builds on an ongoing research project at the Institute of form, theory and history, which involves the residential units and public spaces at Stovner in Oslo. Students will learn how to produce strategically relevant material for a municipal reality in which preservation issues are part of a larger vision for urban redevelopment, closely tailored to match local needs.

At a more general level, the students will gain a deeper understanding of key literature in the field, crucial theoretical concepts and key terms in urban preservation management. 

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Urban preservation consists of a combination of lectures, seminars and field visits to selected urban preservation sites in Oslo and elsewhere. The course requires active participation in seminars and the students are expected to engage in visual ethnography on site, using an array of visual documentation techniques in order to solve the designated fieldwork. In addition, students are expected to conduct archival research and other forms of information harvesting to gather data for their course assignments.

The students will work as one group undertaking the work collectively, under the supervision of Tom Davies during the weekly lesson. Assessment will comprise the group project as a collective endeavour and also short individual essays, reflecting on the experience in relation to the course material. The students will prepare draft versions of the essays and get mid-term feedback from teachers. 

The legacy of the course will be both to have contributed to the identity and profile of the area and (with the provision of opportunity) leave some permanent/long-term installation of the pop-up exhibition for future visitors.

Potential course lecturers

  • Beata Labuhn- Norberg-Schultz late ‘60s thinking and Environmentalism in Oslo
  • Barbara Ascher- Post-war scarcity and housing
  • Even-Smith Wergeland on the work of Erling Viksjø
  • Ben Ford (Oxford Archaeology) new approaches to engaging with community, place and history (The Westgate Project, Oxford)
  • Marte Muan-Sæther (Byantikvaren) on heritage case-work and practice in central Oslo
Pensum

Provisional Bibliography (to be developed)

Aamold, S. (2015). Spesialisering eller samvirke? Om skulptur og arkitektur i gjenreisnings-og vekstårene etter andre verdenskrig. Nordlit 36/2015 (124-25)

 

Gonzalez-Ruibal, Alfredo, et al. Time to destroy: An archaeology of Supermodernity. Current anthropology, 2008, 49.2: 247-279.

Knox, P.L. (2005) Creating Ordinary Places: Slow Cities in a Fast World. Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 10. No. 1 1-11 February 2005

Labadi, S. (2013) UNESCO, Cultural Heritage, and Outstanding Universal Value Value-based Analyses of the World Heritage and Intangible Cultural Heritage Conventions. Plymouth (UK): Altmira Press

Peacock, B.J. (2018) Westgate Oxford Pop-up Museum: How to take Archaeology out into the City. Society for American Archaeology. Advances in Archaeological Practice 6(3), 2018, pp. 248–258

Richards, F. (2019) Gordon Matta-Clark and the Politics of Shared Space. Places Journal March 2019 [Available at https://placesjournal.org/article/gordon-matta-clark-spacism/ Accessed 13/06/2019]

Trohaug, H. (1999). Arkitekt Erling Viksjø. Norsk arkitekturmuseum.

Zagato, L. (2015). The notion of “Heritage Community” in the Council of Europe’s Faro Convention. Its impact on the European legal framework. In Tauschek, M. (eds.) Between Imagined Communities and Communities of Practice. Unversitetsverlag Gøttingen. 141.

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
ProsjektoppgaveIndividuellBestått / ikke beståttFeasibility Study (Norsk: mulighetsstudie)

The students will harness the archival material and field work data to produce a written and visual assessment of a proposed preservation plan or method. This will take form as a compact feasibility study, allowing the students to explore a realistic strategic format typically devised in the early stages of a municipal planning process. While the students are expected to demonstrate basic mastery of the conventions of a feasibility study, they are also encouraged to critically engage with the standard format in order to introduce unorthodox perspectives and modes of presentation, exploiting their creative and visual skills. The scope of the final document will be decided upon in dialogue with the local community for whom the study is developed.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Prosjektoppgave
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:Feasibility Study (Norsk: mulighetsstudie)

The students will harness the archival material and field work data to produce a written and visual assessment of a proposed preservation plan or method. This will take form as a compact feasibility study, allowing the students to explore a realistic strategic format typically devised in the early stages of a municipal planning process. While the students are expected to demonstrate basic mastery of the conventions of a feasibility study, they are also encouraged to critically engage with the standard format in order to introduce unorthodox perspectives and modes of presentation, exploiting their creative and visual skills. The scope of the final document will be decided upon in dialogue with the local community for whom the study is developed.
AktivitetKommentar
OppmøteThe course requires active participation in seminars and excursions. Students are expected to organise and carry out field work to support their individual projects. In addition, students are expected to conduct archival research and other forms of information harvesting to gather data for their course assignments.
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Oppmøte
Kommentar:The course requires active participation in seminars and excursions. Students are expected to organise and carry out field work to support their individual projects. In addition, students are expected to conduct archival research and other forms of information harvesting to gather data for their course assignments.