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2024 Høst

Start semester

40 330 Speculative futures #3: Ecology and Economy

Credits: 
6
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Speculative futures #3: Ecology and Economy
Course code: 
40 330
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
16
Person in charge
Lisbeth Funck
Matthew Anderson
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to master in architecture at AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS)

Course content

Studio Positions propose an ongoing program of research and studio teaching within the framework of Speculative futures, through work based and theoretical research. Over four semesters the studio aims to question and develop innovative critical and sustainable approaches to architecture.

In autumn 2024, the studio is part of a European collaboration project (BIP), European cities in transition: Charleroi – River Sambre, with five other architecture schools in Europe and local actors.

The students will critically examine the legal and economic circumstances and consequences of selected historical and contemporary case studies of human actions in matters related to the environment and animal welfare. The material will be collected in an archive that will form a common source of knowledge for the workshop in Belgium in October 2024.

 The workshop will consist of field-studies operating in the blurred zone between the rural landscape and the city, documenting in different media the multiidentity of the river, aiming for an expanded portrait of the river.

Learning outcome

Knowledge:

  • Ecology and economy Critical reflections on the architect s´ role in times of climate change
  • Contemporary discourses related to status of international and national laws and convention of protections of non-human life.

 

Skills:

  • Theoretical research skills International interdisciplinary groupwork and presentation of work for an international professional audience.

 

General competence:

  • Critical thinking Interpretation of research data into an architectural context
Working and learning activities

Individual and groupwork Investigations and written critical reflections of selected cases Lectures Reading One week workshop /fieldwork

Excursion: Charleroi – River Sambre, Belgium The students will receive a travel grant that covers costs for travel and accommodation NB! 18.10 – 26.10

Tuesdays program: individual and group research, lectures, discussions Workshop in Belgium. 

Participation is required.

Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Project assignment-Pass / fail
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Project assignment
Grouping:-
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:

Start semester

60 314 Mapping Rural Norway

Credits: 
6
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Mapping Rural Norway
Course code: 
60 314
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
20
Person in charge
Espen Aukrust Hauglin
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS)

Course content

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide students with the opportunity to collect, edit, analyze, and visualize geographic data, either as prerequisite or as an integrated part of project development.

The course will introduce basic concepts and methods in mapping, spatial analysis, and GIS. As a case, the course will explore rural communities in northern parts of Østerdalen with a focus on the study of spatial and non-spatial relationships between the built environment and natural resources. The approach to the study is through cartographic mapping and how maps developed in GIS provide insight and knowledge about the use of GIS to study spatial and local phenomena.

The course will emphasize describing situations today, as well as discussing any development opportunities that potentially can be derived from the mapping and detailed cartographic studies.

The course builds on the elective course Coastal Mapping (www.coastalmapping.no), which studied the fishing industry's footprint on land in northern Norwegian fishing villages in the period 2018-2022.

Learning outcome

Knowledge:

- Handling geographical information and cartographic representations on a territorial and local scale.
- Knowledge of and skills in studies of urban form from a cartographic perspective.

Skills:
- Skills in using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for visual mapping and analysis.
- Skills in putting together and presenting a complex spatial study.

General competence:
- Knowledge of rural areas which gives competence to understand and work in this type of area.
- Competence in GIS and handling of geographical knowledge entered on own CV.

Working and learning activities

The course will be organized as joint work with lectures and seminars on mapping, spatial analysis, and GIS. Each student will produce maps and material that describe and discuss rural communities in northern parts of Østerdalen.

The course will conduct an excursion to the northern parts of Østerdalen during the semester

Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Project assignment-Pass / fail
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Project assignment
Grouping:-
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:

80 302 Norwegian tectonic traditions

Credits: 
6
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Norske tektoniske tradisjoner
Course code: 
80 302
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Spring
Language of instruction: 
Norwegian
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
16
Person in charge
Kolbjørn Nesje Nybø
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

The course is open to students from: Architecture, Design and Landscape Architecture

Course content

Studies of historical Norwegian house types, structural systems, and construction methods. The focus will be on wood and wooden structures, iron and iron structures, and old masonry structures with lime mortar and plaster. 

Learning outcome

Knowledge: 

  • Be able to identify Norwegian structures in wood, iron, or masonry in an architectural-, cultural- and technical context. Be able to explain the architectural design, structural system, and craft traditions. 

Skills: 

  • Be able to apply the knowledge by participating in the building of a full-scale structure.

General competence: 

  • Good understanding of traditional Norwegian building methods and material properties. 
Working and learning activities

The first part of the course consists of lectures, discussions, and mini excursions. Parallel to this the students will write a scientific essay; this can also involve scientific experiments or model building. The essay must be submitted and presented for the class the week before the immersion week. The immersion week will be a workshop at AHO or somewhere else, where the students will build the structural system of a small house in full scale. 

Curriculum

Click here for reading list in Leganto.

Mandatory courseworkCourseworks requiredPresence requiredComment
Exercise 1RequiredA scientific essay will be written during the semester, with submission before elective course week.

The essay must be presented orally and is part of the final assessment.

The essay can have a self-selected topic, and can be written alone or in a group, but it must highlight a topic that is relevant to the course. The essay can also be an explanation of your own scientific experiment, your own physical model or the like.

Annet - spesifiser i kommentarfeltet RequiredThe elective course week is a workshop: Building a small full scale timber framed building.

Active participation in the workshop is required and is part of the final assessment basis.

if you are prevented from participating in the elective course week, a replacement assignment must be submitted.
Obligatoriske arbeidskrav:
Mandatory coursework:Exercise
Courseworks required: 1
Presence required:Required
Comment:A scientific essay will be written during the semester, with submission before elective course week.

The essay must be presented orally and is part of the final assessment.

The essay can have a self-selected topic, and can be written alone or in a group, but it must highlight a topic that is relevant to the course. The essay can also be an explanation of your own scientific experiment, your own physical model or the like.

Mandatory coursework:Annet - spesifiser i kommentarfeltet
Courseworks required:
Presence required:Required
Comment:The elective course week is a workshop: Building a small full scale timber framed building.

Active participation in the workshop is required and is part of the final assessment basis.

if you are prevented from participating in the elective course week, a replacement assignment must be submitted.
Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Portfolio assessment (Vurderingsmappe)IndividualPass / failThe course is assessed on the basis of scientific essay, presentation of the essay in plenary and participation in the workshop or submitted replacement assignment.
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Portfolio assessment (Vurderingsmappe)
Grouping:Individual
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:The course is assessed on the basis of scientific essay, presentation of the essay in plenary and participation in the workshop or submitted replacement assignment.
Workload activityComment
LecturesAttendance and participation in lectures is expected.
Written assignmentsWriting of a scientific essay
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Workload activity:Lectures
Comment:Attendance and participation in lectures is expected.
Workload activity:Written assignments
Comment:Writing of a scientific essay

Start semester

40 328 Restore values: Høvikodden. The Provenance of an art center

Credits: 
6
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Restore values: Høvikodden. The Provenance of an art center
Course code: 
40 328
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
12
Person in charge
Erik Fenstad Langdalen
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Course content

This seminar explores the full material provenance of the Henie Onstad Art Centre (HOK), located at Høvikodden in Bærum, including building materials, technical infrastructure, furniture, display systems, lighting, maintenance systems, as well as the thousands of art works that has been on display across the decades.

By thorough investigations of the archives at HOK and at other locations, and through on-site surveys of the building, the students will excavate the sourcing, ownership history, production history, economy, usage and alteration records of the components, materials and artworks.

By constructing an alternative history of the building,  this seminar challenges the way we understand and value-assess buildings, and might change the way we transform them for the future. In addition, the seminar aims to provide scenarios for HOKs future development.

Henie Onstad Art Centre was inaugurated in 1968 and designed by the young architects Jon Eikvar and Svein-Erik Engebretsen. It was radical of its time, both in terms of its curatorial ideas and its innovative architecture. Initiated and funded by the figure skater and Hollywood movie star Sonia Henie and her husband, the shipowner Niels Onstad, HOK represented a state-of-the-art cultural institution much inspired by Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and Louisiana Museum of Modern Art outside of Copenhagen. Based on the personal relationships of HOK’s director Ole Jørgen Moe with people like Pontus Hultén, Willem Sandberg and Knut W. Jensen, the new center aimed for a new definition of art, showcasing contemporary music, dance, performance, film and photography alongside paintings, drawings and sculpture, engaging its visitors in new ways.

Eikvar and Engebretsen, recent graduates from Statens Arkitektkurs at Statens Håndverk- og Kunstindustriskole (later Oslo School of Architecture) and employees at Nils Holter’s studio, won the competition in 1965 with an innovative scheme influenced by ideas that was circulating at the time. The project development and the building process progressed in line with the radical museum concept, including experimentation with new materials, 1:1 mock-ups, «electronic» site-management and more. Since 1968, the building had been expanded, altered and restored several times, and the art center has gained reputation as one of the leading art institutions in Scandinavia.

The seminar is part of the research project Provenance Projected. Architecture Past and Future in the Era of Circularity led by Mari Lending and Erik Langdalen, and will contribute to a forthcoming book and an exhibition at Henie Onstad Art Centre. Curators and staff at HOK will participate in the course, in addition to artists, historians and faculty at AHO. 

Learning outcome

Knowledge:
• Knowledge of HOK and the curatorial and architectural context the art center was conceived within, as well as the material and technical culture the architects were engaging in
• Knowledge of the discourse of preservation and reuse of architecture, including provenance studies

Skills:
• analytical, interpretive, critical, and creative skills essential to work with preservation projects, including archival research, surveying methods, as well as archiving, editing and dissemination techniques

General competence:
• Through individual studies and group discussions, participants will be encouraged to examine their own disciplinary position, and be equipped with the critical and communicative abilities necessary to participate in the public discourse on the field

Working and learning activities

The seminar will use HOK as its main arena for weekly meetings and on-site studies. In addition to readings and lectures, each student will be given a category to study throughout the semester (examples):

1. Art (loans and collection)

2. Display systems

3. Ceilings

4. Load-bearing walls

5. Non-load-bearing walls

6. Floors

7. Stairs and ramps

8. Lighting

9. Furniture and objects (storage systems, seating, desks, shop, paper, computers)

10. Technical systems (ventilations, electrical, security, heating, plumbing)

11. Operation and maintenance systems (art handling, cleaning, restoration, repair)

12. Outdoor systems (vegetation, earth, rock, paths, roads, historical traces) The findings will be assembled and disseminated in the Restore Sanity database. The final output will be in the form of a presentation and a pop-up exhibition.

 

Weekly trips to HOK

The course has weekly half day seminars on Tuesdays and it is mandatory to attend at least 80% of the seminar days.

Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Project assignment-Pass / fail
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Project assignment
Grouping:-
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:

Start semester

40 329 Life Cycle Methodology WALL ASSEMBLIES

Credits: 
6
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Life Cycle Methodology WALL ASSEMBLIES
Course code: 
40 329
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
20
Person in charge
Tine Hegli
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Course content

The seminar introduces practice-oriented strategies that can assist design development processes in achieving emissions reduction (climate mitigation), reduced waste production (resource efficiency) and further nurse necessary systemic changes in the building industry, cross sectors and in society at large (circular economy).

 

The fall semester 2024 we will focus on surplus masses from construction sites as point of departure for investigation of biobased building materials. We will examine quantities of surplus mass, what they consist of, how they are transported and where they end up in today´s linear economy. The aim of the exercise is to explore the upscaling potential for utilization of these masses and further narrow down the studies to investigations of alternative wall assemblies. Finally we will compare physical properties, resources efficiency  and environmental footprint to elements of existing practice. The second half the semester the students will bring in exterior walls (single materials or full assemblies) relevant for their studio project and make an identical analysis to open for discussions on environmental sustainability and circular practice.

 

The course will run in close collaboration with the studio Circular Prototyping CRITICAL MASS and be linked to ongoing industrial initiatives. We will use FutureBuilt guildelines as boundary conditions for emissions reduction aligned with the UN 1.5-degree target and possibly involve directly in actual pilot projects.

 

At the core of the course curriculum lays Life Cycle Assessment (LCA);  a methodology for assessing environmental impacts associated with all life cycle stages of a material/product, process or service. The assessment method provides transparency to the way design decisions are made and opens up for discussions on how to improve societal and/or commercial systems to meet the UN Sustainability Development Goals (SDGs). The course theoretical set-up and associated design assignments will provide an opportunity for in-depth investigation that can further lead to innovative results across studio environments and institutes. The course outcome is an illustrated report documenting the actual assessment (comparative study) and a reflection upon the potential for systems improvement. Parts of these studies will involve site visits, meetings with industry, physical investigation of surplus masses and development of representative physical models.

 

Learning outcome

Knowledge:

  • Knowledge on historical background for today’s geopolitical agenda in relation to UN Sustainability Development Goals (SDGs) and impact of the IPCC 1.5-degree pathway.
  • Knowledge on climate mitigation strategies as resulting policies applicable for the building industry – nationally and internationally.
  • Knowledge on design strategies to lower up-front carbon emissions; assessment of material properties and environmental impacts, circular design strategies and use of lifecycle methodology as guideline to assess environmentally sound result (LCAs).
  • Knowledge on production and use of bio-based materials throughout history, and of products already introduced in today’s building industry.

 

Skills:

  • Framework, vocabulary and references relating to the LCA methodology.
  • Use of LCAs as design drivers in iterative design development processes.
  •  

 

General competence:

  • Assessment of material properties and environmental footprint as an integrated part of design development across disciplines.

 

Working and learning activities
  • Studio project as case
  • Report – template – catalogue
Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Report-Pass / failIllustrated report
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Report
Grouping:-
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:Illustrated report

Start semester

40 331 Exhibiting Architecture: Forensics, Fashion, Ecologies

Credits: 
6
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Exhibiting Architecture: Forensics, Fashion, Ecologies
Course code: 
40 331
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
12
Person in charge
Tim Ainsworth Anstey
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Course content

In this seminar students get to work on an exhibition proposal for a museum in northern England that explores the relation between architecture, dress, room and landscape through studying the “attributes” of an amazing seventeenth century noble-woman. The provisional exhibition title is “Lady Anne Clifford: Forensics, Fashion and Ecology” and it will open at the Abbott Hall Museum, Cumbria, UK in Spring 2025. 

In the seminar students will use architectural means – scanning, modelmaking and sectional drawings – to make archival information speak. Anne Clifford moved in life from being a wronged heiress to a powerful political actor, and used dress, representation, building and physical travel to secure her ends. Student work will address the sectional space this endeavour occupied, between the detail of costume, architectural interiors and exteriors and the open landscape.

The seminar aims to combine historical study and architectural technique to increase our awareness of material and ecological links, at scales from the jewel to the region.

The course is carried out in collaboration with Professor Judith Clark, London College of Fashion and Ryan Cook, Intermediate Unit 9, The Architectural Association.

Learning outcome

Knowledge:
 • Practiced conceptual thinking about the communicative potential of architectural mediation techniques

Skills:
• Learnt basic research techniques based on using archival information
• Demonstrated how the analytical techniques they already have can be applied to historical material in order to produce vibrant new design propositions.
• Developed precise writing techniques to caption an exhibition display

General competence:
• Evolved tech

Working and learning activities

In the first part of the term, working in small groups, students will define a sectional condition that can be reconstructed from the archival information surrounding Anne Clifford. They will research the means of architectural mediation that could make this condition speak (drawing, model-making, scanning). This research will be contextualised by seminars that provide an account of the cultural history surrounding the both the period, the persons studied and aspects of method investigation. In the second phase the groups will construct the architectural mediations of the sections they have chosen, and develop ideas about how these might be used in the exhibition space at Abbot Hall.

The elective concludes during elective week with a field trip to Northen England both the look at a series of architectural spaces that relate to the project assignment and for a final critique of the exhibition proposals in the gallery space in Cumbria. Students need to finance the costs for travel from Norway to the UK and for three-four nights accommodation. Those who remain in Oslo during the field trip will be allowed an additional three days to complete the main assignment, particularly proposals about the exhibition design, and will participate in the final review digitally.

The course has weekly half day seminars on Tuesdays alternating between digital and physical format.

Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Project assignment-Pass / fail
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Project assignment
Grouping:-
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:

Start semester

40 332 Vitruvius – an investigation

Credits: 
6
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Vitruvius – an investigation
Course code: 
40 332
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
12
Person in charge
Victor Plahte Tschudi
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to master in architecture at AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Course content

The course reaches back to the foundational text in architecture, Vitruvius´ De Architectura (On Architecture) written ca. 20 BCE. It aims to re-evaluate the text and unravel the messages Vitruvius carries to today, concretized in specific areas of investigation. The first part of the course centers on understanding the text and its context, including some of Vitruvius´ central notions, and the books´ translations, interpretations, and publication history. A second part traces Vitruvius´ influence on architectural history and theory from antiquity to the present. A third part explores the relevance of Vitruvius today and aims to investigate how De architectura yields new and meaningful dimensions to the practice and thinking of architecture. Areas of investigation include materials, color, notions, gender, sustainability, the role of the architect, and the idea of the classical.

Learning outcome

Knowledge:

• Insight into the currents of architectural history from antiquity to the present.
• Understanding of bookmaking and publication history
• A grasp of central themes and notions in architecture that range from ideas such as beauty, “the classical”, and the problematic relation between architecture and words to the secrets of materiality, color, and the climatic impact on architecture nestling within Vitruvius´ text.

 

Skills:

• Analysis and interpretation of text
• Presentations of text
• Ability to conceptualize ideas and remanifest them as concrete projects

 

General competence:

• Ability to do independent research, write and present short papers, imagination and dexterity to develop projects.

Working and learning activities

The course is organized as combination of lectures and seminars on Tuesdays throughout the term. The lectures provide a context for the work and is held by practicing architects, as well as book- and architectural historians. The seminars take the form of workshops in which texts are discussed and themes developed. The course includes a midterm presentation of a preselected text-passage from Vitruvius and a final presentation and exhibition of relevant projects. Short daytrips are also on the agenda.

Students meet weekly (Tuesdays) for obligatory seminars and lectures and are expected to actively participate in discussions. Work includes short oral presentations of “finds” and a final project of written and visual material.

Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Project assignment-Pass / failThe assessment is based on general course work and on a final project that consist of combination of visual material and an oral presentation
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Project assignment
Grouping:-
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:The assessment is based on general course work and on a final project that consist of combination of visual material and an oral presentation

40 421 Nordic light in architecture

Credits: 
6
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Nordic light in architecture
Course code: 
40 421
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
16
Person in charge
Kathrine Næss
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

The course is open to students from: Architecture

Course content

Background:

How daylight enters a room, is essential to our behaviour, well-being and health.  The unique climate of the Nordic hemisphere, characterized by an angle of the sun between 0-10% approximately 35% of the time and cloudy, diffuse light 2/3 of the time necessitates a distinct approach to daylight in architecture on northern latitudes.

In housing projects quantitative methods are predominantly used, and although building regulations are only securing a minimum average percentage of daylight; climate and context are not taken into consideration.  A qualitative approach to working with daylight is mostly discussed in smaller housing projects. There is a need to improve how we assess and work with quality of daylight.  

The objective of the course is therefore to provide students with basic tools and methods to assess both quantity and quality of daylight in the process of Making. Additionally, it aims to bridge the existing gap between technology and the art of building — encouraging students to adopt both a technical and phenomenological approaches to daylight in their work. The course also seeks to enhance students´ competance and awareness of local specificity concerning climate and context, emphasizing the potential of daylight as an essential generator for architectural quality.

In the course we work with both physical and digital models to establish an awareness of precision in the representation of light. We establish a relation between daylight in the scale model, representation of daylight in the digital model and how it is perceived and observed in the already built (1:1).

Each student will individually frame an interest related to the studio project (mastercourse) and build a model 1:20 of parts of the project where methods and tools to assess either quantity or quality of daylight are discussed in drawings, images and models.

The course is structured around research-based teaching methodologies, and students and teachers will actively participate in a collaborative effort spanning Nordic countries, aiming to improve education on daylight within the region.

Learning outcome

Knowledge:

  • of daylight theory (history of daylight, ongoing research projects, scientific)
  • of the specific Nordic light (Nordic climate) and its characteristics.
  • of taxonomy of quality of daylight
  • of various kinds of light and shadow
  • of the relationship between geometry, the light opening and the context and how it affects the “light-figure” in a space.
  • of Building regulations and requirements in TEK 17
  • of glass as material and how it affects light

 

Skills:

  • In basic tools for assessing both quantity and quality of daylight in the process of making
  • In using simple tools to draw the “light-figure” with diffuse skylight in plan and section (no-sky line + “upper and lower daylight limit”)
  • In representation of daylight in both analogue and digital models
  • In conducting a process of making architecture with daylight as the main generator.
  • In digital tools for measuring quantity of daylight and daylight resources on the façade (VSC).

 

General competence:

 

  • In the ability to translate theory and methods into the architectural making process.
  • In utilizing the tools and methods introduced in the course to assess quantity and quality of daylight within own architectural work.  
  • In demonstrating av understanding of the complexity of the multifaceted nature of daylight, and how that can be used to achieve spatial qualities.
  • In reflecting upon the multiple perspectives on daylight: sustainability, energy, climate, health and behavior.
  • In an awareness of the effect the specific characteristic of material has on daylight (reflection, color, texture etc.)

 

 

Working and learning activities

The course is structures into 3 modules: 1) Tools & Method 2) Explore—geometry and daylight, and 3) Daylight work.

 

Each module includes of 1 task, relevant lectures and readings, feedback sessions, and pin-up presentations.  Attendance is expected at all common activities.

 

Teaching activities and communication are organized through the Outlook calendar

 

  1. Tools & Method

 

  • Observing daylight over time: Drawings, models, photography and simulations to document both quality, quantity and variations of light over time in one specific room
  • Comparison of analogue and digital tools to assess daylight quality and quantity in one specific room.
  • Reading essential texts (papers, articles, essays) and present short lectures to the group.
  • Interviewing practicing architects on their tools and methods to assess daylight quantity and quality in the process of making.
  • Excursion to Daylight LAB, NMBU, measuring daylight in a physical model.

 

  1. Explore —geometry and daylight

 

  • Exploring the potential of Nordic light in models (spatial instruments to investigate the relation between proportions, geometry and light openings) and model photos — with the aim to make a taxonomy daylight quality on northern latitudes.
  • Case study —historical references.

 

  1. Daylight Work

 

  • Using tools and methods from Module 1 and 2, to explore further one specific daylight condition in the studio project, in model 1:20, drawings and images.

 

Curriculum

Course literature will be available in Leganto.

Mandatory courseworkCourseworks requiredPresence requiredComment
Presence required RequiredStudents are required to attend no less than 80%.
Obligatoriske arbeidskrav:
Mandatory coursework:Presence required
Courseworks required:
Presence required:Required
Comment:Students are required to attend no less than 80%.
Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Portfolio assessment (Vurderingsmappe)-Pass / failThe basis for assessment in the course is based on a portfolio consisting of assignments and presentations.

To pass requires hand in of the assignment in all 4 phases and attend 80% if the course activity. Students will be assessed on what is achieved in relation to described learning outcomes and on the project assignment (all 4 phases).
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Portfolio assessment (Vurderingsmappe)
Grouping:-
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:The basis for assessment in the course is based on a portfolio consisting of assignments and presentations.

To pass requires hand in of the assignment in all 4 phases and attend 80% if the course activity. Students will be assessed on what is achieved in relation to described learning outcomes and on the project assignment (all 4 phases).
Workload activityComment
AttendanceStudents are expected to attend all course days and be active participants in the seminar activities.
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Workload activity:Attendance
Comment:Students are expected to attend all course days and be active participants in the seminar activities.

Start semester

60 539 Sustainable Architecture and Urban Studies

Credits: 
24
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Sustainable Architecture and Urban Studies
Course code: 
60 539
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
16
Person in charge
Andreas Kalstveit
Jørgen Johan Tandberg
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to master in architecture at AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Course content

For the past years, the course Sustainable Architecture and Urban Studies has investigated the implications of the green shift on Norwegian cities, towns, and rural areas.

As with any paradigm shift, the focus on greener urban development enforces existing political conflict lines and makes them more apparent. The implementation of a new, green power industry is required for the country to reach its goal of reducing emissions by 55 percent within 2030; yet this typically collides with another international commitment, that of preserving vulnerable nature. Urban living in larger cities has been proven more sustainable due to the minimized transport needs; yet at the same time we need to safeguard communities in the country’s periphery that maintain more traditional ways of living.

The intention of the course Sustainable Architecture and Urban Studies is to study the issues and potential conflicts that arise as the country is changing, and more importantly: to dare to discuss them through architectural proposals.

In Flekkefjord, we looked at how the city could handle a growth of 2000 skilled workers, if a new battery factory was placed in nearby Lista. In Beitostølen, we looked at how the the town could increase the number of tourists while preserving vulnerable nature. In Gjersrud Stensrud, we investigated how new forms of autonomous public transport could facilitate 10,000 new homes in a way that also maintained as much virgin land as possible. In Horten, we looked at how the city itself could absorb the need for new holiday homes in the Oslo Fjord and be revitalized through new jobs and activities in the city centre. In Grorud, we studied how housing areas could be planned to implement new knowledge about sustainable urban freight, limiting the need for large scale transport within a neighbourhood.

 Each semester, we choose a new site and a new theme, typical of the challenges Norway faces in the near future. We develop proposals that are defined by a clear strategic purpose on a regional level, a defined building program that is in actual, realistic demand, a rational, sustainable, and economic means of construction, and a seductive public image. Our role as architects is to bring these things into a higher unity: our aim is therefore to develop strategic building projects that can also serve as exemplars for a new "aesthetics of sustainability".

This semester, we will continue our collaboration with Bane NOR Eiendom, a subsidiary of Bane NOR, the government agency that owns and operates the Norwegian railway network. Bane NOR Eiendom is in possession of all Norwegian railway stations, and is responsible for the development of a large amount of real estate throughout Norway. The course is a collaboration between the Institute of Urbanism and Landscape and the Institute of Architecture.

Learning outcome

Knowledge:

-Increased knowledge about sustainable construction, detailing and urban planning.

-Ability to analyze the urban fabric of Norwegian cities, and situate a strategic building project.

-Greater awareness of an architectural project’s impact upon its local context.

-Ability to reflect critically upon the extent of an architectural proposal as an intervention on an urban scale.

Skills:

- Urban analysis

- Urban design strategies for sustainable cities and rural areas.

- Architectural design

General competence:

-Ability to communicate and discuss Architectural projects and Urban design proposals.

-Ability to develop an individual architectural project.

-Ability to develop architectural drawings and printed material on a high level.

Working and learning activities

We will devise viable and sustainable strategies for the future development of an urban area (TBD), in collaboration with Bane NOR Eiendom and local municipalities. The course is structured so as to educate “generalists” that are Course description of master level course - Sustainable Architecture and Urban Studies.docx 2 : 2 interested in developing a project at all levels: regional strategies, urban plans, building plans and typical details. The output of the course will be both urban plans (overall strategies) and building proposals (exemplary buildings). We will work in phases, from a regional scale to a building detail scale, consulting experts at strategic points throughout the semester. Bane NOR will be involved throughout the semester. There will be desk crits each week, and a final presentation at the end of each phase.

We arrange a study trip abroad to study exemplary building projects and engage with international professionals.

Attendance requirements:

Compulsory supervision 1-2 times a week throughout the semester, and for pinups and presentations. Submission of digital presentation with printed material.

Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Portfolio assessment (Vurderingsmappe)-Pass / failAssessment folder includes presentation.
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Portfolio assessment (Vurderingsmappe)
Grouping:-
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:Assessment folder includes presentation.

Start semester

40 568 Circular prototyping: Critical mass

Credits: 
24
Full course name in Norwegian Bokmål: 
Circular prototyping: Critical mass
Course code: 
40 568
Level of study: 
Master
Teaching semester: 
2024 Autumn
Assessment semester: 
2024 Autumn
Language of instruction: 
English
Year: 
2024
Maximum number of students: 
16
Person in charge
Tine Hegli
Required prerequisite knowledge

Admission to master in architecture at AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Course content

Teacher team:

- Tine Hegli
- Andrea Pinochet
- Lina Broström
- Arnkell Petersen

The Circular Prototyping studio offers students a comprehensive understanding of architecture within the context of environmental sustainability. This semester the studio will examine surplus masses along with other earth and bio-based materials, and their potential use in the Nordic context. In particular, the studio will be concerned with the design of a prototypical building that could be prefabricated or mass-produced, quickly, and easily with surplus masses.

 

Surplus masses: From waste to resource

Surplus masses are the unused excavated masses, or material, that comes out of a construction site. The studio will interrogate how we can test and give agency of these excavated masses that are often regarded as waste in the building industry. What opportunities can new technology give us when working with them? 

 

Clay-rich soil is often considered a waste product in a contemporary excavation site —In 2021 alone, 12 million tons of earth masses were removed from building sites, often ending up in the landfills. Clay is present in various forms in large areas of the country and has been used as a building material for centuries. In Norway, for instance, we find many fine examples of earth buildings more than a century old. However, clay is not always well regarded by builders, in part because there are few building standards or products readily available in the local industry; and in part because the knowledge and craft of how to use clay has been lost over time. How can local history and informal knowledge prove relevant to confront today’s imminent ecological challenges? Can a renewed understanding of materials offer new opportunities for architecture? 

 

Upscaling 

Through an in-depth study of these materials, we will gain a deeper understanding of how we can reframe our relationship with material extraction, shifting the balance in the building industry towards design choices that are more inclusive of earth and bio-based materials. We will also address issues relating to labor, building ethics and environmental politics. And we will discuss our role as architects in developing this new-old industry, with agency to instrumentalize traditional ecological knowledge and change the current building culture.

 

The studio will be part of a collaboration with Asplan Viak, Henning Larsen and other industry representatives.

 

Description of the studio series

The curriculum centers on the principles of circular building practices, with a specific focus on building materials and construction techniques that substantially mitigate environmental impact. These principles are investigated within a design-studio format, equipping students with vital tools to guide form-finding processes and facilitate critical evaluation of sustainability measures as an integral part of the design process. The design explorations also include climate adaptation as consideration of local weather and climate conditions, spanning the historical context, present circumstances, and future climate scenarios. These projections, in parallel with strategies to reduce negative impact, establish a meaningful link between present design choices and their alignment with the long-term UN Sustainability Goals (SDGs).

 

An essential aspect of the curriculum involves introducing students to the application of lifecycle methodology and environmental assessment (LCA) as a decision-making tool. LCA enables students to analyze the environmental impacts associated with linear versus circular practices, fossil versus renewable resources, and provides insight into policy considerations to facilitate sustainable outcomes.

 

The studio´s core activities revolve around design projects that mirror architectural practice. The hands-on experience with prototyping allows students to apply theoretical knowledge in a practical manner and foster a deeper understanding of possibilities and challenges at hand as we move forward into a future with circular economy and ecological awareness. Each studio semester focuses on in-depth investigations of different materials or components in relation to their environmental potential.

Learning outcome

Knowledge:

  • of climate mitigation strategies relating to construction
  • of climate adaptation strategies relating to construction
  • of circular construction principals
  • of evaluating environmental impact of choices through quantification
  • of earth and bio-based materials (resource availability, properties, behavior, application)
  • of constructive logic in building with earth and bio-based materials
  • of historical and vernacular traditions in working with earth and bio-based materials
  • of regional climate conditions and thermal comfort

 

Skills:

  • In analog/digital tools for calculation environmental impact (LCA)
  • In techniques and tools to build with natural materials in various ways
  • In circular design development from concept to finalized built project (from sketch to building manual and final assembly)
  • In practical and constructive detailing when working with earth and bio-based materials
  • In critical thinking upon standard practice and to reflect on future circular design possibilities and strategies

 

General competence:

  • Ability to design and assess our making from a circular perspective.
  • Assessing environmentally sound design results, learning to integrate in-depth materials investigations and big-data climate studies as parameters in the form-finding process.
  • In being able to understand possibilities of using earth and bio-based materials as an alternative to carbon intensive materials.
  • In understanding the complexity of a building process and construction site (resource availability, time, economy, transportation)
  • An awareness of the political agenda in relation to climate mitigation and adaption – nationally and internationally.
  • Design competence from working with conceptual models and drawings, physical models to scale, 3D models, 2D drawing 1:200 – 1:20.

 

Working and learning activities

The course is built up in 4 modules: 1) Nordic context 2) Prefabrication 3) Prototyping 4) Design development

 

Each module consists of 1 task, relevant lectures and readings, feed-back sessions, and pin-up.  There is expected presence at all common activities. We use outlook calendar for teaching activities and communication.

 

  1. Nordic context
  • Getting to know earth and bio-based (experiments, investigation)
  • Visiting relevant buildings in Norway.
  • Introduction to technical properties of materials (GWP, U-value, hygroscopic qualities, durability in exposed situations etc.)
  • Introduction to lifecycle methodology and LCA

 

  1. Prefabrication 
  • Study trip within Europe with purpose to learn from practices building with earth and bio-based as well as how to industrialize and scale up.
  • Studies of relevant built references.

 

  1. Prototyping 
  • Students are asked to develop and design a wall prototype for a Nordic context. A prototype that can work for various purposes.
  • Mock-ups in 1:1 will be worked on as an integral part of this phase. 

 

  1. Design development
  • The students will design a building with their prototype and work with drawings, models, and illustrations to strengthen their ideas.

Study trip within Europe.

Form of assessmentGroupingGrading scaleComment
Project assignmentIndividualPass / failPin-ups in plenum, weekly individual and group supervision, student-to-student feedback session, internal and external censor present at midterm and final review
Vurderinger:
Form of assessment:Project assignment
Grouping:Individual
Grading scale:Pass / fail
Comment:Pin-ups in plenum, weekly individual and group supervision, student-to-student feedback session, internal and external censor present at midterm and final review

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