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In memorial to Jeppe Aagard Andersen

In memorial to Jeppe Aagard Andersen

That Jeppe is not here is a big loss for us. Our thoughts go to Lone and their children. Thank you for sharing. Ars longa, Vita brevis.

Just over four years ago, AHO had the honor and the pleasure of appointing Jeppe Aagaard Andersen as Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Department of Urbanism and Landscape.

Jeppe Aagaard Andersen's work represents a golden age in Danish landscape architecture. Kronborg Castle in Helsingør and the Waterfront in Malmö are among some of his most important works. Designs that make a significant contribution to the history of landscape architecture as well people's everyday life.

His contributions have also included international organizational efforts to strengthen and promote landscape architecture. For decades he has been a key figure in IFLA. This is just one example of all the dedication and care Jeppe has given to the discipline and profession.

The choice to apply for AHO was not coincidential. Jeppe expressed that time was right to share experiences and knowledge from his long-standing and highly influential practice. The master wanted to dedicate himself to the education of coming generations of landscape architects- Fortunately he chose Oslo School of Architecture and Design to do so.

Both his practice and his academic work was special. Jeppe was never mediocre or indifferent. Here we are at the core of the wonderful world he generously shared with us. Jeppe's world opens for the experience of coherence and continuity; in landscape architecture, in light, in space, in water, in time, in the world. Jeppe's world is always about what is essential.
For AHO, Jeppe's arrival became an important turning point and the real beginning of joining the architecture and landscape architecture programs closer together. Jeppe stood for an approach to the subject that blends well with the school's long and strong design traditions. He had as one of his program statements that the two disciplines of architecture and landscape architecture have a lot to learn from each other. He established a course in landscape architecture for architectural students. At the same time, he was aware of the need for the landscape architectural community to stand firmly on its own. He had both visions and ambitions for AHO.

He initiated cooperation with the city of Oslo, where students and teachers at the school developed a beautiful project. During a summer, the temporary park at Filipstad became world famous and intensly visited by tourists and Oslo residents.
 
Jeppe was able to engage and cultivate strong talents among our students. He contributed to the development of the international master's programme in landscape architecture and the start-up of the five-year masters in landscape architecture.
 
He generously opened a major international, disciplinary network for both students and colleagues and contributed to a broader recognition of the programme, both nationally and internationally.
 
It is impossible to understand that we will not hear your subtle laugh again, that we will not make more plans, that we will not discuss the new landscape architecture training with you.

That Jeppe is not here is a big loss for us. Our thoughts go to Lone and their children. Thank you for sharing. Ars longa, Vita brevis.