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2020 Vår

Start semester

40 634 Positions: Co-existence

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
Positions: Co-existence
Emnekode: 
40 634
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
24
Emneansvarlig
Lisbeth Funck
Matthew Anderson
Forkunnskapskrav

Passed level bachelor in architecture

Om emnet

Co-existence is the state or fact of living or existing at the same time or in the same place, related to a specific place and (all of) its inhabitants.

 

In the spring semester 2020 Studio Positions continues to discuss Coexistence related to architecture and culture. We have borrowed the title of the semester task from the 17th International Architecture exhibition: How will we live together?

 

Learning from the city of Venice including its cultural, sociological, economical history and its building tradition, the task for the spring semester 2020 is to develop a structure that critically discusses “Otherness”. Through an architectural project the students are asked to investigate the relation of the whole and it´s parts, and between public and private space in terms of ownership.

 

An individual architectural program is to be developed, framed by each student’s findings/interests in situ in Venice. Relevant topics to be discussed throughout the semester will be; the ghetto, autonomy and community, heterogeneity and homogeneity, to alter, to renew, to remain, to repeat, to substitute, originality, autonomy and novelty, recurrence, recombination.

 

 The main aim is to critically discuss Co-existence through an architectural construction related to the given topic - informed by the extraordinary historical and architectural complexity of Venice.

 

 

Architecture & Culture_Studio Positions:

Studio Positions offers in depth studies of the structures that make up architecture and how these structures relate to their environment. The studio aims at investigating new approaches to the making of architecture by change of position, facilitating movement and different viewpoints, as the spatial term position indicates. The studio draws on established knowledge but also challenges our understanding and knowledge of existing buildings and the environment. We are preoccupied with not only how architecture is made but also the presence of architecture and the affect (aesthetic experience) it produces.

 

1. Making as culture: architecture and the production of presence - Architecture as autonomous structures

2. Architecture as culture: Architecture understood related to contemporary and historical culture: architecture, sociology, philosophy, literature, and art. - Architecture as carrier of traditions and architecture as challenger of the established culture.

Læringsutbytte

Increased knowledge and skills in:

  • Research based design practice: Investigation methods – not problem solving
  • Architectural properties: Geometric ordering, the immanent potential in the matter, relations of building entities
  • Architecture programming
  • Visual and written argumentation
  • A deeper understanding of the fundamentals of architecture

 

Discussions on:

  • Relevant topic related to the semester task
  • Architecture and culture:

The relation between architecture and culture has always been reflected in the arts and architecture and as we today face fast progressing climate changes the relevance of the topic is reflected in the effort put into research. New knowledge brought forward through more technical based research will inform the development of buildings to come. The artistic challenge is to consider the knowledge as input and not as the result in itself and to challenge how we conventionally look upon nature – as its superiors. The studio will question

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Pedagogy: Research based design practice

Studio Positions provides an arena for students to concentrate and develop their own position in relation to architecture, inspiring them to delve into the social and cultural challenges that mark our time, and reflect on how these challenges have influenced our relationship to architectural space and how we use it.

The studio has a research-based teaching, were the student is encouraged to

  1. develop an individual formal/architectural language through both a research-informed and sensuous approach, and through different media investigate architectural issues/questions based on the given topic and
  2. to place/position their project within a the larger cultural context, and to develop a deeper understanding of the fundamentals of architecture
Evaluering og kvalitetssikring

Form of examination:

Architectural design. Individual investigation. 20 weeks semester task

Written assignment

Large physical structures

Minimum attendance (80%) at reviews and announced studio meetings

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
ProsjektoppgaveIndividuellBestått / ikke bestått
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Prosjektoppgave
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:

Start semester

40 635 Body and Space Morphologies : Catharsis - Acting and The Collective IV

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
Body and Space Morphologies : Catharsis - Acting and The Collective IV
Emnekode: 
40 635
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
20
Emneansvarlig
Rolf Gerstlauer
Forkunnskapskrav
  • The elective course 40 301 Architecture & Film (6ect) is mandatory for students who are planning to work for longer periods in the Lista Field-Studio.
  • Students who choose to follow the regular CATHARSIS Studio can choose between all the elective courses.
Om emnet

INTRODUCTION:

Body and Spce Morphologies: Content, Overall Aims and Methods

Body and Space Morphologies is a research-based teaching program placed in the field of Architecture & Culture studies. Dedicated to Phenomenology in Architecture, the program offers Trans-Disciplinary master studios (Catharsis – Acting and The Collective, 24 ECTS) and elective courses (Architecture & Film, 6 ECTS) in explorative - architectural and pre-architectural - making, sensing and thinking.

From The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Phenomenology (2012, Dan Zahavi, ed.):
“Phenomenology shares the conviction that the critical stance proper to philosophy requires a move away from a straightforward metaphysical or empirical investigation of objects to an investigation of the very framework of meaning and intelligibility that makes any such straightforward investigation possible in the first place. It precisely asks how something like objectivity is possible in the first place.”

Our attempt is to partake in the discourse on the Phenomenology of Architecture by working and studying Architectural Phenomenology outside of the Conventions of Architecture. In theory, this can mean a free-thinking, and to some degree also a “free-making” and/or “free-looking”, yet in the realm of our studios it means the making of a dedicated Artistic Research which is looking for the Creation of a Material Practice in which the student can gain a certain expertise in and through which the discourse on the Phenomenology of Architecture can be tried on – if it not already is embodied by the material itself.

We aim at preparing and enabling students to conduct their own investigation into Architectural Phenomenology understood as a Research Creation; a working mode creating an inspired Material Practice “attuned to process rather than the communication of outputs or products” (https://thepedagogicalimpulse.com/research-methodologies/). We consider this to be the Artistic Parallel to both Traditional Scholarly Research and Common Architectural Design Practice.

SPECIFICS FOR SPRING 2019:

The CATHARSIS Studio on Acting and The Collective (# IX in the series – 24ect):

Based on performativity and affordance theories, performance and performance studies, disability and neurodiversity studies as well as phenomenology and perception theories, the Catharsis studio works and investigates primal pre-architectural material/processes/phenomena/conditions and develops or performs a series of experienced distinct objects that behave relational, that inspire imagination, that provide new knowledge, architectural interests and/or architectural identities.

Instead of mediating architecture through a thought process that works with abstraction, illustration and representation, and that is intentional and argumentative involving the use or development of concepts, ideas and strategies, our design process focuses on the acting, sensing and thinking with objects, and the craft of our hands in the making of them.

Students individually study the performance of and with materials of their choice. The studio emphasizes reiterated acting with a material body and gains experience and confidence in the making as a “becoming or being architecture”. Lectures, individual reviews and an extensive reading list enable the students to enter the discourse on the phenomenology in architecture on the base of their own material practice, and to furthermore collectively and critically reflect on theories and research related to perception, affordance, behavior, performativity and performance in architecture and/or environments.

The Body and Space Morphologies studio on Catharsis – Acting and The Collective develops full master study programs for students interested in spending all, or most of their master studies in this course. The work and study will end in a diploma thesis making and demonstrating a material practice in architectural phenomenology that potentially can roam (and conclude) all of the works made in the master courses.

Læringsutbytte

For the CATHARSIS Studio (with the extension of the LISTA Field-Studio):

The Catharsis Studio students learn how to develop strong initiatives for an explorative working process that acts on impulse and that creates visual/haptic experience that again stimulates, or re-states/re-news, architectural content. As a student in the Catharsis studio one is asked to submit to performativity as the instance in which to act a material or event - hence the individual act, or the acting and making, makes also the discursive space of the social(ly) employed collective phenomenology in architecture: the three forms of creativity that in Norwegian language are skaperglede, skapertrang and skaperkraft, make in sum again that what could be named as “skaperkunnskap” – the Creative Knowledge about this which is created.

After completing the course, the student should have:

Knowledge of

  • the basics in phenomenology of architecture and the various practices that exist within (and that can become part of) architectural phenomenology

  • the basics in affordance theory and the theories concerning objecthood and/or object relations as means to fuel and reflect upon a material practice and/or artistic research in the field of architecture

  • the basics in performance and performance studies that make body & space morphologies: ways of making, looking at, discussing and seeing/understanding qualia and perception in the working of architecture

  • the basics in disability studies and neurodiversity studies as the necessary activist movements working and re-defining the human condition from “all the world’s a stage” (Shakespeare) towards for all of the human spectrum with its diverse behavior

  • the basics of performativity, language and speech acts as the tools that can add value to the making and a work – but that not necessarily must seek to replace the issues at stake in a work or a thing

  • the foundational preparations for an advanced haptic visual and experimental artistic research leading to a material practice and/or architectural phenomenology

Skills in

  • finding, developing and/or embracing initiatives for the making of an inspired, explorative and imaginative artistic research

  • manufacturing physical and/or visual (or otherwise sensible/perceptible) works and gaining a unique expertise in the craft(s) deployed in the making of these artifacts

  • conducting this artistic research with the desire to make or pursue a material practice containing, or inviting for, reflections in phenomenology of architecture / architectural phenomenology

  • deploying complementary ways of working and means of creative investigations that make, demonstrate or narrate a dialogue between the works inherent qualities and how this connects to (or can become) issues, phenomena and/or subjects in the world

  • maintaining a personal diary of the making that can be worked into documents of the making aiming at a third-party readability

  • approaching environments, situations and discussions phenomenological and applying and recognizing performativity in speech and action as productive means from which to provoke and receive social employed knowing in trans-disciplinary teams

Competence in

  • developing distinct initiatives and choosing the craft in which to act or work them so as to partake in the discourse on the phenomenology of architecture

  • approaching and acting on impulse with all sorts of material, objects, environments and/or events and gaining valuable experience, artefacts and/or documents from this

  • conceiving of and presenting/communicating unique architectural content/research through a haptic visual material and the phenomena or conditions contained and experienced in it

  • understanding the mechanisms and rhetoric of systems of oppression, learned behavior, eugenics and stigma that are un-productive and unsustainable (in the field of architecture as well as in the systems we call architecture)

  • developing and/or pursuing life-long initiatives for a material practice in architectural phenomenology that is independent of, and/or adaptable to, any kind of professional commission

  • not knowing a thing, but having the passion, dedication, endurance and imagination to wanting to get to know it

 

R. Gerstlauer, AHO, October 2019

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Organization, Workload and Activities

The course is organized as a studio in which each student has a designated working area for the whole semester (usually we are assigned to “tegnesal” S12 or S13). The working week goes from Wednesday to Monday. Tuesdays are reserved for the studies in the elective courses (6ect). Friday to Monday are silent working days while the studio meets for every Wednesday and Thursday from 10 to 6 for lectures, screenings, reviews and work-table talks.

We have five public mid-term reviews and prepare at the end of the semester a work display for the AHO WORKS Exhibition. The exhibition allows for the students to display their complete works (all objects and artefacts – found or made) together with a book (and/or film or video) containing a written and/or otherwise illustrated experience of their making and that what the making had connected to. An external sensor team will study the exhibition and books (and/or video/films) and then give feedback and critique on the individual work but also on the studio as a whole.

The Body & Space Morphologies diploma thesis candidates are integrated in the studio and work in the same space. We recommend the Catharsis course students to attend the diploma mid-term reviews (between four or five in the course of the semester).

We plan two excursions to the Lista Peninsula in Southern-Norway. The first visitation in February happens in the form of a four-day long field-trip in which each student draws from the affordance that resides in that particular landscape to make site specific-works and/or to gather material and experience relevant for the working process in the studio. The second visitation (during the regular excursion week in March) is organized as a mix between study-trip, seminars, talks, performance events, craft workshops and work-demonstrations related to the being in and coping with the affordance and challenges of a landscape (and culture) exposed to rapid change.

The above describes the regular Catharsis Studio as it will take place here at AHO. However, in addition to the two above mentioned excursions to the Lista Peninsula, we can offer (and recommend this strongly!) for students to have extended stays in the Lista environment - please read the next chapter for more information on this initiative.

The LISTA Field-Studio II (runs for the 2nd time as an integrated part of the Catharsis Studio – 24ect /+ 6ect)

In collaboration with Farsund Commune, section for culture and sports, Stiv Kuling AS architects as well as private business and landowners, the Body and Space Morphologies teaching and research unit established for the academic year 2019/2020 the LISTA Field-Studio as an extension to the Catharsis Studio.

Students of the Catharsis Studio are given the possibility to spend longer periods in Lista than as is planned for the two above mentioned excursions – or alternative; to even spend the whole semester in Lista (the latter alternative requires though students to sign up to both of the Body & Space Morphologies Studios: Catharsis 24ect and Architecture & Film 6ect)

Students choosing to work in the LISTA Field-Studio are given free accommodation, access to the land and personnel capacities as well as material recourses etc..

The aim with this initiative is threefold:
a) to provide students with the possibility to spend shorter or longer periods on the LISTA peninsula in order to draw from the affordance that resides in this particular multi-faceted cultural landscape.
b) through the individual works of the students to collect and show a growing body of artistic research that reflects on issues of - or that makes new subjects relative to – the Lista Peninsula.
c) to strengthen ongoing and/or to make new collaborations for the establishing of an International Interdisciplinary Research Creation project-proposal called The LISTA Project.

The CATHARSIS Field-Studio in LISTA is run by the architects Jan Gunnar Skjeldsøy and Anders Eik Pilskog, Stiv Kuling AS, Farsund. Their atelier will serve as common place for discussions and the supervising of those students working in Lista. However, students choosing this option are entirely free to decide where and what to work with. The initiative for an artistic research – what it copes with and wants to try itself on - still remains the responsibility of the student.

Please contact the teaching body for more information on accommodation, working conditions and possibilities.

Pensum

The Body and Space Morphologies studios collaborate with capacities in other fields of the Humanities (and the Science) providing us with the Trans-Disciplinary syllabus (lectures, readings and field-studies / excursions) necessary to individually and collectively ponder and reflect on Phenomenology in Architecture; the Human Condition and the Creative Act it is to make and conceive of Relational Objects or Architectural Phenomenology.

Teachers and Main Collaborators

Rolf Gerstlauer, professor, architect and multimedia artist/researcher at The Oslo School of Architecture and Design, AHO. Head of the Body and Space Morphologies research and teaching program. Maintains an artistic practice together with Dind and collaborates with her in implementing aspects of Disability and Neurodiversity Studies into the teachings of the Body and Space Morphologies studios.

Julie Valentine Dind, performer/artist/phd-student, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies, Brown University, Providence/USA. Dind’s scholarly work provides the Body and Space Morphologies studios with an updated syllabus on Performance and Performance Studies, Disability Studies and the Neurodiversity Movement. The Body and Space Morphologies studios serve as laboratory in which this work is sought to be implemented into architectural education – and architecture per se.

Jan Gunar Skjeldsøy & Anders Eik Pilskog, architects, Stiv Kuling AS, Farsund/Norway. Skjeldsøy and Pilskog, both former AHO students, are long-term collaborators to the studios and since 2019 also our teaching assistants. Together they sign responsible to run the LISTA Field Studio (2019/2020).

Inge Eikeland, head of the section of culture and sports, Farsund Commune, together with other public, private and academic institutions and local as well as international capacities or resources that assist us, or spar with us, in finding ways of entering the Lista Peninsula as the ground that gives affordance for the making of a future Research Creation Project.

Recommended Literature and Mandatory Readings

At the start of the semester, a detailed "recommended reading list" is handed out. Most of those readings are for the semester made available in the course book-shelf in the AHO library. Additional readings, most of Dind's papers and other relevant texts that make the course syllabus / mandatory curriculum, are handed out as pdf's in the Moodle platform of the course.

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
ProsjektoppgaveIndividuellBestått / ikke beståttAttendance & participation – individual studio work:
20 weeks full-time study. The work has to be conducted and performed in the studio (or at LISTA) - the working material is present at any time.

Presence & participation - collective studio discussion:
Weekly talks, lectures and studio discussions. Frequent work reviews. Workshop. Book making. Final exhibition. Final review with invited guests-critics.

Exercises (practical and theoretical), Project (individual presentation and submission) and Text/Essay.

Presentation/Exhibition:
For each of the reviews, assignments are announced and the students hand in visual and textual works which is complementary to the actual physical work made available and presented in the reviews. The final exhibition includes visual haptic material and a final book (including an essay of ca 5-10000 words).
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Prosjektoppgave
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:Attendance & participation – individual studio work:
20 weeks full-time study. The work has to be conducted and performed in the studio (or at LISTA) - the working material is present at any time.

Presence & participation - collective studio discussion:
Weekly talks, lectures and studio discussions. Frequent work reviews. Workshop. Book making. Final exhibition. Final review with invited guests-critics.

Exercises (practical and theoretical), Project (individual presentation and submission) and Text/Essay.

Presentation/Exhibition:
For each of the reviews, assignments are announced and the students hand in visual and textual works which is complementary to the actual physical work made available and presented in the reviews. The final exhibition includes visual haptic material and a final book (including an essay of ca 5-10000 words).

Start semester

40 636 SCS: China

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
SCS: China
Emnekode: 
40 636
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2019
Maksimum antall studenter: 
20
Emneansvarlig
Christian Hermansen
Forkunnskapskrav

Prerequisites (inc. previous knowledge): To be a 4th or 5th year student. Most important is to be enthusiastic and positive. Architectural design skills are very important. Skills in Rhino or SketchUp will come in handy. Previous building experience much appreciated. This is a full-time course, all students are expected at the studio from 9:00 AM to 16:00 PM Monday to Friday, in addition to traveling to the building site for a period of around 5 weeks.
Due to the travel requirements of the studio students joining SCS will have to enrol in the 6 credit course, Joints and Jigs, which runs with the studio.
 

Om emnet

The Context
After decades of concentrating resources on urban industrial development which resulted in China’s explosive economic growth, the government has turned its attention to rural areas where it is sponsoring a variety of development initiatives. Urban Environment Design (UED) Magazine and CBC (China Building Centre), have taken the responsibility to develop a number of small rural villages, one of which will be the site of our project.
This is the third semester in which SCS collaborates with Tianjin University School of Architecture (TJU). Previously TJU students joined SCS students during the building phase of the Louna Architects’ Bookshop project and the Xiamutang Childrens’ Teaching Restaurant (see ArchDaily for details). In this coming semester our collaboration will be run throughout the semester encompassing design, production information, and building.
The organisation of the joint SCS + TJU studio.
Through its almost decade long existence SCS has developed a working method which combines individual inputs with group work. We start the semester with individual projects, at different phases vote for the most concepts with most potential, culminating in the last phases where everyone in the studio works on one building. The gradual homing in on the most promising ideas is done through voting. To combat the idea of individual authorship, those whose projects are chosen to progress to the following phase are not allowed to work on their own ideas. In this manner we ensure collective ownership of the final building.
During this semester, this procedure will be extended to encompass students working in China. At the end of each phase projects developed and chosen by the SCS team will be developed by the TJU team during the following phase, and projects developed and chosen by the TJU team will be developed by the SCS team. The final project to be built will thus be the product of both the TJU and SCS teams. During the production and building phases, in which both teams will be working on the same project, the work will be divided into teams composed of both TJU and SCS students.
1. Phase 1 of the studio.
The first two weeks of each semester, in Phase 1, after being introduced to the site, the program, and the clients, students develop individual architectural concepts. These proposals are not yet buildings, but rather attitudes or approaches which could later be developed into buildings. At this stage the studio encourages students to explore as many diverse ideas as possible, with the aim that from this diversity interesting ideas for buildings may emerge.
At the end of the two weeks students are asked to present their ideas to the studio, these ideas are discussed, and voted on. Each member of the studio, both students and teachers, have one vote each. The only restriction is that authors of schemes cannot vote for themselves. Studio members vote for the ideas with most potential for future development. By this means half of the concepts presented, those considered to have most potential, go on to be developed in Phase 2.
To bring together the TJU and SCS teams, the projects chosen by TJU students at the end of Phase 1, will be developed by AHO students during Phase 2, and the projects chosen by SCS students at the end of Phase 1, would be developed by TJU students during Phase 2

2. Phase 2 of the studio.
Pairs of students work on the project chosen by the studio of the other University at the end of Phase 1, that is, Norwegian students work on the projects chosen by Chinese students and vice versa. Teachers form the teams of students to work on the schemes inherited from students of the other university. At the end of Phase 2 projects should have developed beyond an architectural concept and should be recognisable as buildings. The TJU and SCS teams chose the 4 projects which are to progress to the next Phase 3

3. Phase 3 of the studio.
The procedures of Phase 2 are repeated in Phase 3. The four projects developed/chosen by SCS students are worked on by 4 teams of TJU students and vice versa. At this stage the projects should have been developed to a stage in which structure and materials have received attention. The TJU and SCS teams vote for the 2 projects which are to progress to the next Phase 4.

4. Phase 4 of the studio.
The procedures of Phase 3 are repeated in Phase 4. The two projects developed/chosen by SCS students are worked on by 2 teams of TJU students and vice versa. At this stage the projects should have been developed to a stage where they are presented with plans, sections, elevations, and exterior and interior renderings, materials will have been chosen, the structure has been calculated on a preliminary basis, the main construction details have been resolved, preliminary costings have been done, building regulations have been considered, etc.

5. Phase 5, Jury
A jury of Chinese and Norwegian architects independent from SCS and TJU are appointed to choose the final project from the two presented by TJU students and the two presented by SCS students.

6. Phase 6, Production Information
In the four weeks Development Phase, students are divided into production teams who work on specialized aspects of the project. These teams are to be composed of students from TJU and SCS working together connected by means of the internet. The subjects of these teams would include: design development, structural calculations, construction details, costs calculations, building permission submission, construction scheduling, critical path analysis, construction materials, quantities and procurement, sponsorship, media (web-site, blog, Facebook), etc. One student from TJU and one from AHO will be appointed as coordinators of the project. Their roles are to make sure that information is coordinated and consistent amongst the different working groups. The coordination of the information produced by different groups is achieved mainly through the constant updating of a digital 3D model which contains all the information being produced by each working group. Assembling all information into one 3D model of the building tends to make inconsistencies and contradictions more evident. The aim of this phase is to prepare as thoroughly as possible so the teams have determined the materials needed, the way these materials go together, the tools and techniques needed to accomplish construction, and the speed of construction needed to finish the building in the allotted time.

Half way through this Phase, two students from SCS and two students from TJU will travel to the site of the project 15 days prior to the start of construction work to prepare for the coming of the rest of the SCS+TJU teams. Their job is to make sure building materials are located and purchased, the building is set out on the site, and the foundations are cast.

7. Phase 7, Building
The main group arrives on site two weeks after the advanced party and starts to build according to the construction details and schedules prepared in advance.

The diagram below is a graphical representation of this process:

(EMWEB DOES NOT ALLOW LOADING GRAPHICS)

SCS Working Mode and Assessment

The task of designing and constructing a building in the space of five months is quite an achievement, more so because the majority of the participants have never had this experience before.

To make this task possible, SCS is set up as a professional studio. Work is always in the studio, from 9:00 to 16:00, every day. All absences have to be justified by medical certificate or agreed with SCS with sufficient time so that the studio can organise the work accordingly. If you are not able to deliver this commitment, this is not the studio for you.

Teamwork is of the essence, especially in the later phases, we work together to achieve the goal of building the team’s design. This requires all sorts of different tasks, especially during the production and building phases. All members of the studio have to be willing to take on those tasks assigned to them. The task of the team takes priority over individual likes or dislikes.

The Site and the Program

SCS works in the context of the real world. For this reason the task and the process are not totally under its control. The clients and partners involved in SCS projects have their own aims and problems. On occasions decisions made by SCS’s clients have meant that projects have had to be cancelled, either before they get off the ground or during the period in which projects are being developed. We have been faced with clients not keeping agreements, clients not owning the sites we were supposed to build on, etc. On each of these occasions we have had to cancel the project and turn our attention to another task.

Although these occurrences are very frustrating, and SCS does its utmost to organise things so that the projects develop smoothly, everyone in the team has to be prepared for these or other factors to intervene in SCS’s work. This is the price of working with real projects, and it is part of the life of a professional architect. If anyone feels threatened by uncertainty, this is not the studio for you.

The site and program:
At this moment we have the commitment of Urban Environment Design journal and the China Building Centre that they will organise a project for us to design and build, as they have done in previous semesters. However, they have not yet decided which of the villages which they are developing is the one which will be chosen for our project.

Læringsutbytte

Knowledge, skills and competences:
On completing the course, the student:
• will know about, and develop skills and competences related to designing for the needs of a foreign local community
• will know about, and develop skills and competences about detailing and specifications of small communal building.
• will know about, and develop skills and competences about local building regulations and building practices.
• will understand the requirements of buildings in their local climatic settings.
• will know about, and develop skills and competences about building costs and budget management during construction
• will have acquired the skill for using manual and mechanical tools for building.
• will know about, and develop skills and competences about designing and building in conditions of scarcity.

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The studio will be based mainly on one-to-one and small group discussion of student work supplemented by talks and workshops.
Students who join this studio will have to also enrol in the Joints & Jigs course because its contents and scheduling are linked to the studio program development and travel. It is a requirement of the course that students spend the time needed to construct the building in China. Although it is difficult at this stage to determine the length of the period of construction our estimation is four to five weeks. Students will have to fund their own travel, accommodation and food in China. Insurance which covers each student during the time abroad is required and will be the responsibility of each student. It is expected that the trip to China will be around April May 2019. EHS rules regarding students at construction sites will apply during the period in China.

Form of Assessment/Examination
The assessment will be on the basis of submissions, performance and participation in the studio.
The final assessment of each student is based on a combination of individual work (40%), done mostly in the first phases, contribution to group work (40%), and the quality of the final product (20%). Individual work is judged through a report done by each student documenting their contribution to the studio throughout the semester. The contribution to group work is based on a judgement by the teaching staff of the extent and willingness to contribute to the studio work which each student displayed during the semester.

Students will be asked for specific submissions during the semester. These submissions are part of the development of the project in China. As much of the work is done in groups, participation is of the utmost importance.
The final assessment will be made by the external examiner and will be based on:
1. The individual report documenting the student’s individual work during the semester. (40%)
2. The level of participation and contribution to the collective work. (40%)
3. The assessment of the quality of the building and its construction achieved by the studio as a whole. (20%)
The minimum attendance to the studio activities is 80% of organised events.
The final decision as to the performance of each student will be taken by the external examiner (sensor) on the basis of the group performance, a report on each individual’s participation done by the teachers, and a portfolio showing the extent of each individual’s contributions to the studio.
 

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
Annen vurderingsform, definer i kommentarfeltIndividuellBestått / ikke bestått
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Annen vurderingsform, definer i kommentarfelt
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:

80 404 Speculative Ideation: Hand Drawing as Explorative Medium in Architecture

Full course name in English: 
Speculative Ideation: Hand Drawing as Medium in Architecture
Studiepoeng: 
6
Emnekode: 
80 404
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Norsk/Engelsk
Maksimum antall studenter: 
15
Emneansvarlig
Carsten Oeding Loly
Forkunnskapskrav

Opptak til AHO og fullført tre års studier på bachelornivå (180 studiepoeng).

Om emnet

"Speculative Ideation..."

- adresses the capability of the student of architecture to think with and through drawing by hand.

- is practice-based as it focuses on the relation between action and decision making.

- sets out from the particular ´wants`and ´needs` and experiences of the participating student.

- encourages exploration and developement of strategies for personal meaning making by drawing.

"Speculative Ideation" contains three main components:

- Individual study
As a framework, participators choose a subject or a theme to pursue throughout the entire course-period. Investigating and exploring subjects from ongoing or previous studio-courses has proven to be productive, but is not a requirement. To which degree and in what ways the student´s handling of the chosen subject or theme results in meaningful insights is thus a core issue to "Speculative..."

- Individual exercises
Intending to invigorate foundational skills previously presented  and introducing new ones, exercises  will draw upon strategies from art and architectural representation.
Analytical and more intuitive approaches through topics such as materiality, formal analysis and representation are covered; all in the context of ideation. 

The exercises take place at the early stages and come to a halt approximately after one-third of the course period.

- Plenary talks & discussions

See working and learning activities

Læringsutbytte

Enhanced capabilities and awareness of hand drawing´s potential as a personal medium for speculation and ideation in architecture. 

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Excercises
Take place in the first phase of the course
See course content

In-depth study on individually selected topic/theme.
Run throughout the entire course period
See course content

Talks & discussions
Talks and following discussions take place mainly in the first phase of the course
Topics cover best practice within architecture and art.
Analytic and intuitive approaches will be highlighted and discussed. Interactions between digital media and hand drawing are also touched upon.

Plenary discussions based on  work presented by participating students with an opportunity to voices opinions among peers. Two sessions.

Informal evaluation/feedback through:
- individual tutoring, group sessions and plenary discussions
- intermediate presentations (on choice of topic and on status of ongoing work)

Formal evaluation
Final presentation with external sensor . 

Requirements to pass
80% presence on entire course is required to pass. In order to ensure sufficient progression, close collaboration with peer students and teacher in general requires presence from 9am to 4 pm throughout Tuesdays and the elective course week. 

Presence is required at all presentations - intermediate and final.

Digital hand-in of selected work from the course-period.

Pensum

As the course is practice-based and based on the individual needs of the students, a list of literature concerning foundational and technical aspects of drawing and essays and articles concerning best practice within art and architecture is developed along the course and will therefor follow.

 

Obligatorisk arbeidskravPåkrevde arbeidskravOppmøte påkrevdKommentar
Oppmøte til undervisning Påkrevd80% presence on entire course is required to pass. In order to ensure sufficient progression, close collaboration with peer students and teacher in general requires presence from 9am to 4 pm throughout Tuesdays and the elective course week.
Obligatoriske arbeidskrav:
Obligatorisk arbeidskrav:Oppmøte til undervisning
Påkrevde arbeidskrav:
Oppmøte påkrevd:Påkrevd
Kommentar:80% presence on entire course is required to pass. In order to ensure sufficient progression, close collaboration with peer students and teacher in general requires presence from 9am to 4 pm throughout Tuesdays and the elective course week.
VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
Vurderingsmappe-Bestått / ikke bestått80% presence on entire course is required to pass. In order to ensure sufficient progression, close collaboration with peer students and teacher in general requires presence from 9am to 4 pm throughout Tuesdays and the elective course week.

Presence and contribution to all three presentations likewise.

Digital hand-in of selected work from the course-period.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Vurderingsmappe
Gruppering:-
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:80% presence on entire course is required to pass. In order to ensure sufficient progression, close collaboration with peer students and teacher in general requires presence from 9am to 4 pm throughout Tuesdays and the elective course week.

Presence and contribution to all three presentations likewise.

Digital hand-in of selected work from the course-period.
AktivitetKommentar
Individuell oppgaveløsning
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Individuell oppgaveløsning
Kommentar:

Start semester

40 409 Jigs and Joints: design concepts, materials, and making

Full course name in English: 
Jigs and Joints: design concepts, materials, and making
Studiepoeng: 
6
Emnekode: 
40 409
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
15
Emneansvarlig
Christian Hermansen
Forkunnskapskrav

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Basic command of a 3D modeling program, preferably Rhino 3D

Om emnet

The aim of this course is to explore the relation between design, materials, and making.

Driven by the profusion of building materials and components, by the requirements to comply with building regulation authorities, by the threat of legal action, and by the shortage of time, architects often resort to applying standard construction details to their design concepts, regardless of whether or not these ‘copy & paste’ details fit or enhance their design ideas.

There is nothing intrinsically wrong with using the plethora of construction information readily available to architects. But all too often ready-made details are used with only partial understanding of the reasons why they were put together in a particular way and the contexts in which their application is appropriate.

This course starts from the premise that in order to fully understand how to design building details it is necessary to have a direct sensory experience of the materials being used. Juhani Pallasmaa makes a similar point in his book The Eyes of the Skin (p.10)

“I had become increasingly concerned about the bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses in the way architecture was conceived, taught and critiqued, and about the consequent disappearance of sensory and sensual qualities from the arts and architecture.”

When Louis Kahn asked  “What does a brick want to be?”, he was rhetorically calling attention to the relation between material properties and design,

"You say to a brick, 'What do you want, brick?' And brick says to you, 'I like an arch.' And you say to brick, 'Look, I want one, too, but arches are expensive and I can use a concrete lintel.' And then you say: 'What do you think of that, brick?' Brick says: 'I like an arch.'"

Læringsutbytte

On completion of this course you will:

  • Learn about wood as a building material.
  • Learn how to model a digital prototype, and use this as as a basis for production.
  • Learn to think sequentially - order of operations, and how this feeds into the architectural outcome.
  • Acquire knowledge on the construction of jigs to assist in precise and repetitive tasks.
  • Learn to think critically in regards to how details are designed.
  • Acquire insight on the importance of details.
  • Learn to understand how architectural elements are integrated into a design concept.
Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The course will consist of a study of a material (timber) and its use in one building. We will choose buildings in which the use of timber reveals an understanding of the nature of that material and the full utilisation of its characteristics as a complement of the design concept.

We will choose one detail from the building which is exemplary, in that it meets its functional requirements and contributes to the design concept of the building.

We will then build that detail, at scale 1:1, if practically possible. To aid in the making of the detail you will design and construct a jig. We use the word ‘jig’ as both ‘An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end’ and ‘a device that holds a piece of work and guides the tool operating on it’. The jig will ensure the precise construction of the joint using only those hand tools commonly available in a building site.

Obligatorisk arbeidskravPåkrevde arbeidskravOppmøte påkrevdKommentar
Oppmøte til undervisning PåkrevdThe requirement for the course will be to attend lectures, workshop sessions, and seminars (at least 80% overall attendance required).
Obligatoriske arbeidskrav:
Obligatorisk arbeidskrav:Oppmøte til undervisning
Påkrevde arbeidskrav:
Oppmøte påkrevd:Påkrevd
Kommentar:The requirement for the course will be to attend lectures, workshop sessions, and seminars (at least 80% overall attendance required).
VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
VurderingsmappeIndividuellBestått / ikke beståttThe requirement for the course will be to attend lectures, workshop sessions, and seminars (at least 80% overall attendance required), participate in course discussions, hand-in a short report on the chosen building and detail, the built jig, and build the detail at 1:1 using the jig.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Vurderingsmappe
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:The requirement for the course will be to attend lectures, workshop sessions, and seminars (at least 80% overall attendance required), participate in course discussions, hand-in a short report on the chosen building and detail, the built jig, and build the detail at 1:1 using the jig.

80 416 Re-Store: Values

Studiepoeng: 
6
Full course name in English: 
Re-Store: Values
Emnekode: 
80 416
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
15
Emneansvarlig
Erik Fenstad Langdalen
Om emnet

In a time when architects have to reorient towards the reuse of existing buildings, there is a pressing need to discuss the premises upon which the discipline operates. We need to rethink our methods, working techniques and terminology, and raise the question of how we evaluate our cultural heritage. This elective course on experimental preservation aims to interrogate the theoretical and conceptual frameworks used (historically and contemporarily) to approach the preservation and reuse of buildings, cities, and landscapes.

 

Different categories of value permeate our culture, and are prescriptive for the ways in which society perceives its material framework. A heritage object’s importance, worth,or usefulness is subject to fluctuating opinions and practices, as is its mere status as a ‘preservation-worthy’ object. But what, exactly, are the values that prompt the preservation of a monument, regulate its reuse, and allows for its continued existence? Where are these values grounded, and by whom are they defined? 

 

Value is an abstract term with a myriad of denominations. This seminar examines the multiple aspects of “value” that each, in its way, condition the preservation, use, longevity and estimation of monuments and material heritage. 

 

Examples of categories for valuation:

  1. Age value 

  2. Authenticity (and its subcategories; processual, material, etc)

  3. Useability

  4. Occurrence and uniqueness 

  5. Pedagogical value

  6. Symbolic value

  7. Representative value (memory, identity, ideology)

  8. Anecdotal value

  9. Exchange value, market value, material value

  10. Labor cost

  11. Newness-value, zeitgeist and fashion

  12. Imposed values (herein colonialism and postcolonial critique)

  13. Contested values, permanence and flux 

  14. Zoom -- the scalar sensitivity of values, and the perceptions of value at different scales (urban, architectural, material)

Læringsutbytte

The course will familiarize students with the history of preservation and its current discourse. Students will develop analytical, interpretive, critical, and creative skills essential to work with preservation projects. Through individual studies and group discussions, participants will be encouraged to examine their own disciplinary position, and be equipped with the critical and communicative abilities necessary to participate in the public discourse on the field.

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Drawing from a diverse pool of canonical, experimental, academic, poetic, speculative, contemporary, and historical texts, the students will be assigned readings relating to the week’s topic for discussion. Each session will begin with a contextualizing introduction by the instructors, including a relevant case study. This will form the basis for a student-led discussion, informed by the predefined topic, the assigned readings, and the set case study.

In addition to the readings, the course will have weekly deliverables in the form of a word/image diptych (a short text coupled with visual media). These will, by the end of the semester, form a collective “catalog of values”.

Students are expected to attend all course days and be active participants in the seminar activities. 

Evaluering og kvalitetssikring

Evaluation of "catalogue" with written and visual material 

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
VurderingsmappeIndividuellBestått / ikke bestått
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Vurderingsmappe
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:

Start semester

40 412 Venice myths

Studiepoeng: 
6
Full course name in English: 
Venice myths
Emnekode: 
40 412
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
15
Emneansvarlig
Alma Elisabeth Oftedal
Om emnet

Venice holds a unique place in literary and cultural history. In this course we will study texts in which Venice have a principal role.  

Læringsutbytte
  • Knowledge of central directions in modern cultural theory
  • Knowledge of the origins of different Venice myths.
  • Knowledge of  how to write a reflection paper
  • Knowledge of how to use drawing to explore the relationship between literary, cultural and architectural themes
Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The course is organized as a sequence of workshops. In these workshops, the students will be given writing tasks and drawing tasks based on the texts on the syllabus. In this way they will investigate how the texts have contributed to the formation of different Venice myths

Pensum
  • Barnes, David. 2014 «Fascists: The Stamp of the Lion». The Venice Myth. s. 91-106.
  • Barthes, Roland. Excerpts from Mythologies (English version) / Mytologier (Norwegian version) [Originally published in French in 1957].
  • Calvino, Italo. Excerpts from Invisible Cities. [Originally published in Italian in 1972].
  • James, Henry. 2001. The Aspern Papers [Originally published in 1888].
  • Mann, Thomas. 1995. Death in Venice. [Originally published in German in 1912].
  • Ruskin, John. «Introduction» and «The Quarry». The Stones of Venice. [Originally published in 1851-53]. p. 7-32 and 33-52.
VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
VurderingsmappeIndividuellBestått / ikke beståttMappen skal bestå av et refleksjonsnotat og tegninger. Tegningene vil bli diskutert i plenum underveis. Det vil bli gitt veiledning underveis i arbeidet med refleksonsnotatet. Det vil bli gitt en samlet vurdring av mappen i slutten av kurset.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Vurderingsmappe
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:Mappen skal bestå av et refleksjonsnotat og tegninger. Tegningene vil bli diskutert i plenum underveis. Det vil bli gitt veiledning underveis i arbeidet med refleksonsnotatet. Det vil bli gitt en samlet vurdring av mappen i slutten av kurset.
AktivitetKommentar
WorkshopsDet forventes at studentene deltar i gruppediskusjoner og leverer kursoppgavene.
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Workshops
Kommentar:Det forventes at studentene deltar i gruppediskusjoner og leverer kursoppgavene.

Start semester

80 613 Re-store: Folkemuséet

Full course name in English: 
Re-Store : Folkemuseet
Studiepoeng: 
24
Emnekode: 
80 613
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
15
Emneansvarlig
Amandine Kastler
Erlend Skjeseth
Forkunnskapskrav
  • Good understanding of written and spoken English
  • Intermediate to a good level of digital modeling and draftsmanship
  • Experience with and interest in building large scale material models
Om emnet

 

The use of the term 'vernacular' is intended to convey a sense of 'realness' but, ultimately, only serves to reveal its own underlying artificiality.

Vernacular architecture is an oxymoron. By its nature, it cannot be appropriated without becoming something else. One could say that architecture is the conscious appropriation of building into culture. As soon as we go near the vernacular, we kill it. But in so doing, we make something else.”

Charles Holland, Architectural Review, November Issue 2019

A Rural Trilogy

The Re Store studio will continue to creatively assess, transform and reuse existing buildings. Building on the foundations of the Modular Vernacular Studio (2018) on coastal heritage and Fieldwork Studio (2019) on large agricultural structures in the countryside, this semester the studio will carry on working with the vernacular but in a site where the urban and rural converge: the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History (Norsk Folkemuseum). Located at Bygdøy in Oslo, it was conceived as an interface between the industrial worker of the city and the rural customs. The studio will use the outdoor collection of buildings at the open-air museum to explore the preservation of historic architecture as a political act, with the aim of instilling a critical appreciation for the enduring benefits and limitations of vernacular construction beyond the pastiche.

It is now 35 years since Kenneth Frampton wrote the seminal essay Towards a Critical Regionalism: Six Points for an Architecture of Resistance. A reaction to the emerging post-modernism of the 1980s spearheaded by Venturi and others, the essay sought to mediate between the local and the global and postulate a resistance to the flattening of architectural discourse and production. The studio will revisit the critical regionalism of Kenneth Frampton, the post-modernism that predated it and problematise the idea of the ‘Genius Loci’ with fresh eyes. We will draw on the spatial and constructional characteristics of the vernacular, to determine the formal qualities that have evolved over time from the bare necessities and resource scarcity while not shying away from discussing the notion of architectural style and tradition in conjunction with contemporary architectural discourse.

By teasing out these implicit characteristics, highly resolved architectural proposals will address key questions: What is the role of a cultural museum today? What values are inherent in vernacular buildings? How are heritage buildings used as markers of identity? What happens to the reading of architecture when the provenance of its components is derived from multiple geographical areas and periods? How should architects design new forms within finite historic environments?

Norsk Folkemuseum

“The Norwegian Cultural Museum Foundation shall build, manage and disseminate historical knowledge and create experiences that are relevant to people's lives in the present and future.”

Statute of the Cultural Museum at Bygdøy

The Norwegian Cultural Museum is a construct. A collection of buildings moved to the city from the rural areas, curated as objects on the stage of nation-building during the latter half of the nineteenth – century. Founded in 1894, the museum is one of the earliest examples of a European wide trend towards the mass production of culture and folklore. National identity in Norway was consciously linked to the medieval era that predated the colonial union with Denmark and Sweden. This editing process is manifested in the collection of buildings through its focus on the vernacular of the inner valleys, presumed untainted by foreign influence. The outdoor museum as a didactic space aimed to showcase the regional variations in building typology, yet there is a curious lack of certain regions.

The selection was also influenced by transportability, which favoured modular notched log buildings, more easily disassembled than stone or masonry. Hence, the circumstances of the formation of the museum had a direct impact on what is today the vernacular canon in Norway. Now a historiographical fact, the museum tells us as much about the formation of the modern nation-state of Norway as it does about vernacular traditions.

When first planned, the museum was in a pastoral setting at Bygdøy with an abundance of space. However, the residential area around grew and the neighbouring institutions set their property boundaries limiting further expansion. Still, the museum is continuously evolving, leading to a densification process and a need for facilities such as educational spaces, sanitary installations, commercial spaces, service buildings, workshops and maintenance facilities.

The studio we will engage with and challenge the museums current development plans. Certain functions might have to be seamlessly integrated into the historic building fabric whilst others will be “back of house” located in restricted areas. The strong demarcation between the curated exhibition and hidden but daily operation of the back-stage areas is a programmatic distinction that could be questioned in the redesign of any museum.

Projects in the studio are not just bespoke tailor-made pieces of architecture, they are carriers of significance. Each project must position its self in relation to preservation discourse and the continued evaluation of the museum as a cultural construct through its design.

Proposals will be site-specific to the highly saturated environment of the museum, nevertheless, the approaches developed to working with the existing will be applicable to other urban or rural areas of heritage significance. The diversity of the approaches in the studio will reflect the pluralistic nature of complex heritage sites, where different parcels require differentiated approaches. Therefore, the output of the studio will reach beyond the one-off proposal and be relevant for anyone who wishes to engage with alternative forms of preservation.

Læringsutbytte
  • Approaching the re-use and transformation of existing structures at varying scales.
  • Formulate individual architectural proposals based on close observation and analysis of present conditions.
  • Analyze and adapt existing infrastructure to develop operational forms of architecture.
  • Utilizing precise surveying technology in both analogue and digital form.
  • Engage actively with real stakeholders, including the local heritage authorities and museum staff. 
  • Learning how to navigate heritage requirements and regulatory framework.
  • Experiencing historic craft methods and Scandinavian vernacular building tradition.
  • Reading basic theory on vernacular, typology and preservation.
Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Kastler Skjeseth will teach the studio with Ane Sønderaal Tolfsen, a practicing architect based in Oslo. Ane will be running the Detail elective course and will bring  a strong focus on understanding architectural detailing in terms of technical, structural and aesthetic considerations in combination with aspects as materials, scale, concept and construction

The Survey

'Traditions' which appear or claim to be old are often quite recent in origin and sometimes invented.”

Eric Hobsbawn, The Invention of Tradition, 1983

Extensive measuring and observation of the case study will be the first act. Surveys will not only quantify physical properties but also the qualify values such as significance, symbolism and tradition. The studio does not consider research to be a separate exercise from propositional thinking, rather, it asserts that the act of surveying is propositional by nature and therefore inherent to design thinking.

Recordings will include architectonic thresholds, such as the relationships between foundations and topography, the domestic interior and the weathered exterior, traditional craft and contemporary construction. In addition, the specific context of the museum as a spectacle and a staged environment will add the dichotomy between the exhibit and the exhibition, between the actors on stage and the structure that maintains and supports. The reading of vernacular buildings often focusses on their relationship to topography and climate (one of Frampton´s six key points). In the case of the museum, the buildings are no longer in their original context.

The Artefact

The survey will be the foundation for the artefact, a large-scale material model that starts the inverted design-process from detail to building. The artefact, a physical and material manifestation of an essential component or junction found in your analysis, is translated into a contemporary building system at scale 1:5 or 1:10. This ‘hot-spot’ is a free-standing bricolage of materials that suggests something more than the sum of its parts. Learning from what has already been built, traditional craft will be translated into contemporary construction methods. Prefabrication and digital fabrication will inform the design, responding to, among other things, site, light, thermal conditions and construction logic.

The Approach and Proposal

To build houses, you must have sites. Are they natural sites? Not at all: they are immediately artificialized

Le Corbusier, La Ville Radieuse, 1933

The proposal will be a complex hybrid of a composite nature, negotiating through architecture the challenge of embedding modern building technology into a historical site, while also requiring that the site itself be designed. The insertion(s) will provide the museum with spaces for maintenance and services, allowing for everyday caretaking as a form of preservation.

Proposals can be deceitful and camouflaged, replacing the dogmatic and hermetic modernist notions of honesty in material and structure with the full deck of cards at hand for an architect in our day and age. Negotiating the contested waters of authenticity, designs can simulate and mimic near surroundings like a chameleon or state distinctiveness by breaking from the referential historicism of the collection like an irreverent black sheep. Engaging with the language of ornament, the textual qualities inherent in vernacular architecture and the potential for its revival through modern fabrication methods is encouraged.

Due to the scarcity of space and the proximity of buildings from different origins, each proposal will have to contain multiple features, differentiated through formal expression, programmatic disposition or its relationship to the immediate context. One part a highly functional space of utility whilst other parts may be of a symbolic nature or even a folly if need be. As parts of a larger strategy, interventions will both transform existing buildings and propose autonomous buildings.

There is a long-standing tradition of moving buildings and reusing architectural elements in Norway. Just like the vernacular houses in the collection were once moved to the museum, the projects should involve one transplant, an addition of a ready-made or pre-existing structure that compliments the existing selection of buildings in the vicinity. The design challenge lies in the adaption and interface between various parts.

Other Learning Activities

Projects will be developed iteratively through architectural drawings and large scale material models. 

The studio will lend considerable attention to fieldwork. Students will be expected to travel to the Norsk Folkemuseum in Bygdøy regularly during the semester.

The studio will primary take excursions in Norway. First, a short trip to the area around the Lake Mjøsa to visit Maihaugen Open-Air Museum, along with projects by Sverre Fehn and Are Vesterlid. We may extend our reach to Sweden. Taking the train to Stockholm to visit the Skansen Open-Air Museum, along with key works by Gunnar Asplund and Sigrud Lewerentz.

During excursion week, we will travel to Lyngør Island to study the coastal typologies that are less represented at the Flolkemuseet. Accommodation on the Island will be subsidized, generously sponsored by the house owners. Students will live in a manor house dating back to the 19th century. The house was refurbished and modernised by Kastler Skjeseth Architects in 2017. Students can expect some costs of travelling back and forth to Lyngør but we will endeavor to keep this cost to a minimum.

Students are expected to work in the studio regularly. Teaching will consist of twice-weekly desk tutorials, seminars, pin-ups and reviews with invited critics. Students are expected to be active participants, to attend all trips, studio meetings, pin-ups and reviews, while keeping up with a rigorous level of production. The studio will be evaluated by assignments and participation, and judged as “passed” or “not passed” (according to AHO regulations for master studies).

The studio will frequently be exposed to a network of builders, artisans, construction sites in various stages and will be closely linked to the practice work of Kastler Skjeseth Architects. http://www.kastlerskjeseth.no/

The studio will run parallel to the EX14 unit at the AA in London that are investigating coastal typologies in Norway with joint excursions and reviews. During the last week of January, the studio will host joint seminar days at AHO with the students from the AA. Link to AA unit brief:

https://www.aaschool.ac.uk/Downloads/briefs2019/Experimental14_19-20.pdf

It is highly recommended to take either the Detail elective course or the Re Store elective course in conjunction with this studio. 

Pensum

The curriculum will be given closer to the start date.

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
VurderingsmappeIndividuellBestått / ikke bestått Pass/Fail, based on the following criteria in relation to the given assignments:

The final grade in the course will be given based on:
- Attendance and design production for twice-weekly studio meetings: 30%
- Mid review and Interim review presentation: 30%
- Final review presentation: 40%

The oral presentation is a part of the portfolio assessment.

Mid review, Interim review and Final review: Work presented for the Mid review, the Interim review and the Final review will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

- Conceptual Clarity: Students should demonstrate proactive engagement with the material and self-motivated intellectual pursuits that enhance their design ambitions. Students are expected to clearly articulate their ambitions and the intellectual underpinnings of their work in pin-ups and desk crits.

- Technique: Students are expected to execute all assignments with care and precision.

Assignments will be evaluated not only on the basis of the ideas, but also to a large degree on the quality of the execution. Students are responsible for planning sufficient time for developing appropriate and thorough representations.

Portfolio: The care taken in the compilation and design of the portfolio the presentation of physical models will be considered in the final assessment. The portfolio is to be formatted and printed at A2 or larger. Each student will also be required to design a portfolio booklet at A3 to accompany the printed portfolio.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Vurderingsmappe
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar: Pass/Fail, based on the following criteria in relation to the given assignments:

The final grade in the course will be given based on:
- Attendance and design production for twice-weekly studio meetings: 30%
- Mid review and Interim review presentation: 30%
- Final review presentation: 40%

The oral presentation is a part of the portfolio assessment.

Mid review, Interim review and Final review: Work presented for the Mid review, the Interim review and the Final review will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

- Conceptual Clarity: Students should demonstrate proactive engagement with the material and self-motivated intellectual pursuits that enhance their design ambitions. Students are expected to clearly articulate their ambitions and the intellectual underpinnings of their work in pin-ups and desk crits.

- Technique: Students are expected to execute all assignments with care and precision.

Assignments will be evaluated not only on the basis of the ideas, but also to a large degree on the quality of the execution. Students are responsible for planning sufficient time for developing appropriate and thorough representations.

Portfolio: The care taken in the compilation and design of the portfolio the presentation of physical models will be considered in the final assessment. The portfolio is to be formatted and printed at A2 or larger. Each student will also be required to design a portfolio booklet at A3 to accompany the printed portfolio.
AktivitetKommentar
GruppearbeidStudents are expected to regularly work in the studio and to be active participants in the collaborative studio environment. Sharing knowledge, techniques, and ideas with your fellow students is incredibly important to your own creative development and to your success in this studio. Students are expected to keep the studio space orderly and to and to collectively organise and maintain a large table and wall space for group meetings and pin-ups.

Students are expected to work independently and to show initiative in locating the resources and supplies they need to complete their work. Since this course involves site visits outside of the school, students are expected to behave maturely and respectfully.
Individuell oppgaveløsningDeadlines and required deliverables are indicated on the syllabus and on individual project assignments and are not negotiable. Students must complete assignments by the given deadline.

Students are responsible for managing their own print schedules and for backing up files. Loss of data will not be considered a valid justification for submitting incomplete project work.

Deadlines can only be extended in cases of illness or special circumstances, and requests for extensions must be submitted to the tutor before the deadline in writing, accompanied by a medical certificate when necessary.
OppmøteStudents are expected to be present and working during all studio meetings, which occur twice a week. Students are also expected to be present during all seminars and reviews. Absences for social engagements, holidays, etc. will not be accepted. Absences from studio meetings and reviews will affect the final grade and multiple unexcused absences will result in course failure.
EkskursjonThe studio will travel to Switzerland during excursion week.

The studio will run parallel to a unit at the AA in London that are investigating coastal typologies in Norway and there will be joint excursions and reviews.
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Gruppearbeid
Kommentar:Students are expected to regularly work in the studio and to be active participants in the collaborative studio environment. Sharing knowledge, techniques, and ideas with your fellow students is incredibly important to your own creative development and to your success in this studio. Students are expected to keep the studio space orderly and to and to collectively organise and maintain a large table and wall space for group meetings and pin-ups.

Students are expected to work independently and to show initiative in locating the resources and supplies they need to complete their work. Since this course involves site visits outside of the school, students are expected to behave maturely and respectfully.
Aktivitet:Individuell oppgaveløsning
Kommentar:Deadlines and required deliverables are indicated on the syllabus and on individual project assignments and are not negotiable. Students must complete assignments by the given deadline.

Students are responsible for managing their own print schedules and for backing up files. Loss of data will not be considered a valid justification for submitting incomplete project work.

Deadlines can only be extended in cases of illness or special circumstances, and requests for extensions must be submitted to the tutor before the deadline in writing, accompanied by a medical certificate when necessary.
Aktivitet:Oppmøte
Kommentar:Students are expected to be present and working during all studio meetings, which occur twice a week. Students are also expected to be present during all seminars and reviews. Absences for social engagements, holidays, etc. will not be accepted. Absences from studio meetings and reviews will affect the final grade and multiple unexcused absences will result in course failure.
Aktivitet:Ekskursjon
Kommentar:The studio will travel to Switzerland during excursion week.

The studio will run parallel to a unit at the AA in London that are investigating coastal typologies in Norway and there will be joint excursions and reviews.

Start semester

80 612 Open Structures: Constructive Logic

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
Open Structures: Constructive Logic
Emnekode: 
80 612
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
16
Emneansvarlig
Andrea Pinochet
Lina Elisabeth Broström
Forkunnskapskrav

Good understanding of written and spoken English.
Intermediate to a good level of draughtsmanship and model making.
Interest in structural concepts, construction details, history and theory. 

Om emnet

Open Structures
Open Structures reflects an interest in investigating structures that have the capacity to operate as frames for a myriad of programs or activities. Structures that may have been conceived to fulfill a particular need or host a particular program, but that are nonetheless open in character and capable of assimilating undetermined futures or dynamic contexts.

Constructive Logic
The studio will be concerned with the design of a small school that could be mass-produced with quick and easy assembly on multiple sites in a given region, focusing primarily on material experimentation and the design of construction processes. 
The studio will observe the construction site as a laboratory of scientific management; a place of highly organized labor, fast paced production and diverse social capital. Therefore, in the design of the individual schools, participants will be asked to conceive of architecture as a dynamic process. Instead of thinking of architecture as a static object, we will address architecture’s capacity for reproduction and discuss the conception of an architectural work as multiple acts of synthesis and manufacture: building as structure and assembly—building as a verb.

Læringsutbytte

This studio will seek to develop an understanding of prototypical qualities through a material perspective. We will study a selection of materials commonly used in the building industry, examining their physical and chemical properties, how raw matter is extracted, transformed and assembled, and its inherent formal and aesthetic qualities.
Through an in-depth study of a particular material and technological development and we will gain an understanding of the complexity involved in the realization of a simple work of architecture. We will also address issues relating to resource extraction, division of labor, building ethics and the politics of the construction site. ​

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The studio will work with precedent analysis of relevant built cases in order to study a selection of materials commonly used in the building industry, examining their physical properties, how their raw matter is extracted, transformed and assembled, and their inherent formal and aesthetic qualities. 
We will organize visits to places of manufacture, and use experimental characterization techniques in order to understand material properties, structural capacity and position in the industry. 
We will embrace the rational and direct aesthetics of the technical drawing, budget sheets, schedules and logistics plans, making discussion around labor and organizational systems as an important component of the course.

Pensum

Syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
ProsjektoppgaveIndividuellBestått / ikke bestått
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Prosjektoppgave
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:

Start semester

60 408 Digital Urbanism: Towards a Nordic Model

Full course name in English: 
Digital Urbanism: Towards a Nordic Model
Studiepoeng: 
6
Emnekode: 
60 408
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2020 Vår
Eksamenssemester: 
2020 Vår
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2020
Maksimum antall studenter: 
20
Emneansvarlig
Jonny Aspen
Einar Sneve Martinussen
Kai Reaver
Om emnet

The subject of this course is to explore the notion of a Nordic model of digital urbanism. We will research how societal values of trust, equity and collective rights might be translated into new kinds of digital urban services. The research will be organized around three kinds of activities: literature studies, mappings of current practices, and explorations of alternative approaches to the design of digital urban services.

Læringsutbytte

Knowledge: The students will gain knowledge about urbanism as a resource for exploring a Nordic model for digitalization across interaction and service design.

 

Skills: The students will learn to explore alternative approaches to the design of digital urban services through readings, surveying/mapping and design experiments. 

Competence: The students will acquire analytical competence for exploring alternative approaches to the design of digital urban services for Nordic settings.

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The course will consist of four parts: 1) a selection of lectures on issues of digital urbanism and the Nordic model, 2) readings and seminar discussions, 3) fieldwork: surveying/mapping of current practices, 4) explorations of alternative approaches to the design of digital urban services (to be written up as final paper / report). 

Pensum

Curriculum will be presented when the course starts.

Obligatorisk arbeidskravPåkrevde arbeidskravOppmøte påkrevdKommentar
Annet - spesifiser i kommentarfeltet Ikke påkrevdStudents are expected to read a short text as a preparation for weekly seminars. The students will also be given the task of preparing seminar presentations based on readings and/or ongoing surveying/mapping activities.
Obligatoriske arbeidskrav:
Obligatorisk arbeidskrav:Annet - spesifiser i kommentarfeltet
Påkrevde arbeidskrav:
Oppmøte påkrevd:Ikke påkrevd
Kommentar:Students are expected to read a short text as a preparation for weekly seminars. The students will also be given the task of preparing seminar presentations based on readings and/or ongoing surveying/mapping activities.
VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
ProsjektoppgaveGruppeBestått / ikke beståttIn the second half of the semester the students will explore more concrete approaches or strategies to the design of Nordic digital urban services. This work will then be written up an explanatory text (3.000–4.000 words) towards the end of the semester. The students are also to prepare a short presentation of their work for the final critique.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Prosjektoppgave
Gruppering:Gruppe
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:In the second half of the semester the students will explore more concrete approaches or strategies to the design of Nordic digital urban services. This work will then be written up an explanatory text (3.000–4.000 words) towards the end of the semester. The students are also to prepare a short presentation of their work for the final critique.
AktivitetKommentar
Oppmøte
Forelesninger
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Oppmøte
Kommentar:
Aktivitet:Forelesninger
Kommentar:

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