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2022 Høst

70 505 Design studio

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
Design Studio
Emnekode: 
70 505
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
30
Emneansvarlig
Rachel Troye
Forkunnskapskrav

Passed foundation level (BA-level) courses at AHO or equivalent, 180 ECTS.

A third semester Master course (only available for students in their final year). Open for all design fields, but students are required to follow up and go in depth within their previous chosen specialisation/field in which they can document advanced design skills through a portfolio and application.

You upload the portfolio here before 10th May: https://nettskjema.no/a/261065

Please specify which track you prefer. 

Recommended prerequisite knowledge

This course builds on the design skills and methods learnt across the previous Foundation and Master courses. In “Design Studio” students and teachers integrate and push these skills and mindsets to create rich projects with a high degree of professionally. For students who want to take part in “Design Studio” a strong sense of curiosity, experimental outlooks and independence are therefore required. “Design Studio” allows students to tailor their own personal development as a designer in preparation for their diploma.

Om emnet

“Design Studio” is an advanced Master course where the students will develop projects across themes and partners curated by the Institute of Design. These can be connected to research projects, external partners or emerging problematics within the field of design. The ambition for this course is to develop stand-out projects where students go in depth into the issues they chose to work with, and create high level outcomes. The core values of the course are exploration and professionalism – meaning that the course encourages the development of reflection, criticality and new knowledge about emerging fields, but also has the ambition of developing high quality deliveries and communication.

In this course students will have a large degree of freedom and responsibility as to how their projects are developed. ‘Design studio’ is a place for students to integrate the knowledge they have gained throughout their education and work towards exploration, professionalism and specialisation. A central part of the studio course is to develop project-experience and knowledge about how different forms of larger design projects can be structured and executed.

Students work individually or in small groups. Each project will be followed throughout the semester by a supervisor and typically, a partner. Partners and supervisors depend on the specialisations and/or themes that the projects take up. Each track supervisor will be responsible for the students that choose to follow his or her track. The track may consist of one long project or several projects.

The main teaching structure is mentoring on project level and the ongoing evaluation of progress. There is a common structure for milestones and core-deliverables throughout the course (development of project descriptions and plans, documentation and deliverables, and main presentations). Co-learning is central across the projects, and students will be involved in developing research, lectures and course-materials for the whole group.

Projects will come out of curated themes and partners developed by the Institute of design or from research topics across the institute’s research projects. Projects can both be done as specialisations towards specific fields or in inter-disciplinary groups, where students from industrial design, service design and interaction-design work together.

Tracks for Spring 2022 will be announced

Læringsutbytte

KNOWLEDGE

  • The core knowledge outcome of the course is to integrate and mature the processes and methods learnt across the Master of Design.
  • Further, students are expected to develop domain-specific knowledge across their projects.
  • Knowledge about how advanced design projects can be structured and organised.

SKILLS

  • Develop and mature individual skillsets as designers.
  • In “Design Studio” students develop and expand core project-handling skills. Including scoping, research, project-description, time-management and communication.

GENERAL COMPETENCE 
Across “Design Studio” the goal is to develop the maturity of the students’ design competence and skills. This is done by both focusing on exploration and professionality on an advanced project-level.

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The main activities of the course will be project- and specialisation-specific. Across the course there will be a focus on learning project planning, developing and scoping. The course is run in a studio setting, and co-learning across the projects, with some shared lectures and presentations etc, are important. The students will be required to make and present one topic specific “lecture” to the whole “design Studio:”

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
ProsjektoppgaveIndividuellBestått / ikke beståttStudents accepted to the different Design Studio tracks must define their own learning outcome together with the track responsible, after deciding their focus area. This will be the basis for their final evaluation. The assessment method is to be decided by the track responsible in dialog with the student.

Students need to present and submit all projects, documentations and presentations in order to be assessed for the course. Students also need to schedule their own mentoring sessions.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Prosjektoppgave
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:Students accepted to the different Design Studio tracks must define their own learning outcome together with the track responsible, after deciding their focus area. This will be the basis for their final evaluation. The assessment method is to be decided by the track responsible in dialog with the student.

Students need to present and submit all projects, documentations and presentations in order to be assessed for the course. Students also need to schedule their own mentoring sessions.
AktivitetKommentar
Oppmøte
Workshops
Gjennomgang
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Oppmøte
Kommentar:
Aktivitet:Workshops
Kommentar:
Aktivitet:Gjennomgang
Kommentar:

70 504 System orientert design: “Design for meget komplekse systemer“

Full course name in English: 
Systems Oriented Design: “Design for Very Complex System“
Studiepoeng: 
24
Emnekode: 
70 504
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Norsk/Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
30
Emneansvarlig
Andreas Wettre
Tobias Luthe
Forkunnskapskrav

Passed foundation level (BA-level) courses at AHO in design or architecture or equivalent, 180 ECTS.

The course is open for all programmes; design, architecture, urbanism and landscape architecture students.

Om emnet

Learn to design for improving the society – using Systems Oriented Design

For dealing with the complexity and uncertainty  of complex contexts of interconnected social and ecological problems, a systems approach is needed to enhance the ability of the designer to design solutions that address the underlying drivers of the socio-ecological crises. This systems approach will empower students with the ability to rapidly learn and understand the complexity of the context to find the most effective places in the system to design interventions that are relevant to addressing the problems. The SOD methodology is applicable in any context and scale, from sustainable product design, better healthcare services, to policy design to sustainability transitions of communities and society at large. An essential part of SOD is to use design skills to visualize complexity.

The methodology can also be used within a spatial framework, where one can focus on the spaces and places of a system as the drivers of the design project. Through the application of SOD to the fields of landscape architecture and architecture the course poses a challenge of expanding student’s work to address their spatial interests at a systematic context with a cross-scalar and transdisciplinary lens.

This SOD fall masters course invites you to get on the dance floor and jointly explore and play with ideas that are rooted in systems thinking and design doing. Through hands-on approaches and tools, you'll be able to take a systemic perspective to nurture your design practice to create things that are relevant to the complex world at different scales, from products to services to experiences to sustainability transitions of entire systems. It will allow you to learn how to use the toolbox of your own field, design, architecture, or landscape architecture and expand it to a systematic level. If you are a curious person who likes to puzzle and have fun with exploring a context broadly and figure out what would be relevant to design to make systemic impacts, you have found the right course for you!

Structure of the course:

This course contains three modules (after a first introduction to SOD methodology)

Module 1 (8 ETCS): Regenerative Systems Design (through immersion in Alpine-Urban reality)

Why the mountain context for learning about SOD? Mountain regions are complex social-ecological systems, vulnerable to global environmental and economic changes, often dependent on single industry sectors like tourism, forestry, or mining. They are prime cases for us to consider how we can design a more resilient, regenerative communities, ecologies and economies.

Module 2 (8 ETCS) Design for local Democracy (Based on module 1, design intervention to enhance local democracy)

You will work on how to transform societies at both local and global scales by orienting business and public sector to deliver on sustainability through enhancing democracy (bottom-up influencing) and innovating governance systems (facilitating top-down structures). Further course foci may feed from Governance Innovation relating with Economic Governance and the implementation of a circular economy on a bio-regional scale.

Module 3 (8 ETCS) Design for Action

It is one thing to figure out your intervention concepts, it is another to implement these concepts into the complex reality. The challenges and complexities of implementation often substantially outweigh the efforts of developing your design.

This module focuses on how to take your design from concept to reality utilizing SOD and other approaches like Change Management, Transition Design and Action Research, or Real-World Laboratory research, to prototype, iterate and implement the concepts developed in module 1 and 2

In all modules you will develop your Rich Design Space

Between each module there is a short period for reflection, digestion and self-programmed reading.

If you want more information look up the menu Projects/Master projects at the website https://systemsorienteddesign.net

 

Other teachers on the course: Haley Fitzpatrick, Birger Sevaldson, Abel Crawford, Jonathan Romm

Læringsutbytte

Students will be introduced to System Oriented Design (SOD) as a method and approach, to:

  • Develop a sensibility for systems, relationships and consequences: cause and effect, to think of how systems are embedded within different domains and different scales
  • Visualize complexity, and using these visualizations as a tool to understand and find interventions to improve the systems
  • Deal with uncertainty through unfolding and understanding complexity while working with “problematiques” (multiple interlinked problems)
  • Anticipate futures through developing an ability to understand and consider multiple future scenarios and evaluate the possible, probable and desirable, developing both individual and participatory visions of the future.
  • Anticipate thresholds for implementation and impacts of designed solutions.
  • Rich design space for working with interventions in complex problematiques
  • Critically think and self-reflect through considering questioning the norms, values influencing the opinions, behavior and decisions of yourself and the stakeholders they are designing for.
  • Considering your role as a designer and citizen in the local community and global society.
  • Navigate sustainability by being exposed to the state of the world and guiding design criteria for sustainability Regenerative, Resilient, Circular, Cross-scale design through a critical lens

 

Skills: The ability to apply the knowledge to solve problems and tasks. There are different types of skills – cognitive, practical, creative and communicative. 

Students will acquire skills in:

  • SOD as process-led methodology
  • Visualizing complexity and utilizing Rich Design Space
  • Research by design methodology
  • Systems Thinking
  • Sustainability Science
  • Ecological Thinking
  • Critical Thinking
  • Dealing with uncertainty
  • Collaboration through interdisciplinary problem solving in groups
  • Visioning
  • Design Implementation plans
  • Workshop facilitation

General competence: to be able to apply the knowledge and skills mentioned above iin an ndependent manner-  in situation that shows skills in being cooperative, responsible, reflective and being able to think critically in education and professional life. 

Students will be able to use SOD methodology to understand and tackle complex problems and to think systemically.

Holistic perspectives, ethics and sustainability as well as cultural, organizational, economic and technical considerations are central to the Systems oriented designer.

These perspectives and the ability to have the project overview is a very good competence for a designer in a team, and also excellent proficiency for a project leader.

Systems-oriented designers can play a decisive role in managing complexity in future societal developments. Systems-oriented designers typically can work in design consultancies, in organizations, in municipalities with service design, on policy level, in the private sector to give some examples.

Systems-oriented designers are trained in techniques such as Gigamapping.

The systems-oriented designer is also a skilled workshop facilitator and leader of co-design processes.

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Module 1 will involve you working in teams, partly independent, partly outdoors and in Hemsedal.

Module 2 and 3 will see you work on a chosen focus context according to the main themes or your chosen self-programmed theme. Projects for Module 2 and 3 can be individual or in groups. Group projects are recommended.

In all modules you will develop your Rich Design Space.

Project plans are created for each project individually according to the demands. Each project requires, in principle, its own project design. The course itself is a dynamic social system that must be adjusted and tweaked in real time.

Pensum

A reading list will come.

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
Vurderingsmappe-Bestått / ikke beståttThe students are evaluated on the basis of participation and effort, milestone reviews, assessment and final project delivery.

All three modules must be passe in orden to pass the course.

Module 1 – Circular systems gigamap, walkthrough presentation/video to communicate how Hemsedal as a community, ecology and economy can transform from its unsustainable status quo today, to a pioneering sustainable system in the future.

Module 2 – Storyboard gigamap, walkthrough presentation/video and chapter contributions to final report with emphasis on leverage points and developed concepts.

Module 3 – Iterated storyboard gigamap, and iterated walkthrough presentation/video with extra focus on implementation and action.
Final report including chapters from previous modules.

Final delivery:
Report - The report is the main delivery.
Final storyboard gigamap (digital and walkthrough video) - that easily communicate the project for the AHO Works Exhibition and sensors.

All project material is to be digitally submitted to an online assignment system.

The project report and gigamaps are to be presented to the sensors.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Vurderingsmappe
Gruppering:-
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:The students are evaluated on the basis of participation and effort, milestone reviews, assessment and final project delivery.

All three modules must be passe in orden to pass the course.

Module 1 – Circular systems gigamap, walkthrough presentation/video to communicate how Hemsedal as a community, ecology and economy can transform from its unsustainable status quo today, to a pioneering sustainable system in the future.

Module 2 – Storyboard gigamap, walkthrough presentation/video and chapter contributions to final report with emphasis on leverage points and developed concepts.

Module 3 – Iterated storyboard gigamap, and iterated walkthrough presentation/video with extra focus on implementation and action.
Final report including chapters from previous modules.

Final delivery:
Report - The report is the main delivery.
Final storyboard gigamap (digital and walkthrough video) - that easily communicate the project for the AHO Works Exhibition and sensors.

All project material is to be digitally submitted to an online assignment system.

The project report and gigamaps are to be presented to the sensors.
AktivitetKommentar
OppmøteStudents are expected to attend all lectures, tutorials and presentations.
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Oppmøte
Kommentar:Students are expected to attend all lectures, tutorials and presentations.

Start semester

70 508 Interaksjonsdesign 1: Exploring interaction design

Full course name in English: 
Interaksjonsdesign 1: Exploring interaction design
Studiepoeng: 
24
Emnekode: 
70 508
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
24
Emneansvarlig
Einar Sneve Martinussen
Forkunnskapskrav

Passed foundation level (BA-level) courses at AHO or equivalent, 180 ECTS.

Recommended prerequisite knowledge

The course builds on some core interaction design skills, such as prototyping, iterative design, user-testing and communication, learnt in the undergraduate courses at AHO. Knowledge about more advanced prototyping tools and methods, such as design-systems, coding and electronics, will be very helpful, but is not a requirement.

Om emnet

‘Interaction Design 1: Exploring interaction design’ will expand, challenge and develop the student’s skills and knowledge in the field of interaction design. The course focuses on creativity and exploration in and through iterative design. Through a series of modules, students will explore tools and methods currently used in the design of digital experiences, systems and services - across complex contexts, technologies and user situations. The course embraces the creative possibilities and challenges of new technologies and new design methods. Through the course students will meet several different ways in which interaction design is being used to explore new opportunities in industry and research today. The course will include topics such as:

  • Creativity and invention in interaction design through hands-on prototyping
  • Exploring new technology through design
  • Understanding the physical, spatial and temporal aspects of both the user situation and the technology one is designing for and with
  • Evaluation and practical use of technological systems, design systems and conceptual frameworks
  • Reflection on and communication of novel design approaches and outcomes

The course is module-based and will consist of several different projects where students work with, among other things, prototyping and experiences, creative exploration and methodology, and innovation and communication. The cases, tools and methods addressed and used will vary slightly from year to year, but may include topics such as experience prototyping, working with electronics, evidencing and visualization, video prototyping, Web experiments, and exploring new technology in context.

This course continues much of the content from the previous, well-established course ‘Interaction design 1: Tangible interaction’, but the themes, tools and scopes have been reworked and expanded.

The course contributes to overall learning objectives at the programme level by giving students a broader experience of creative exploration through interaction design, with the methods and tools this includes. 

Læringsutbytte

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS

After the course the students should be able to:

  • reflect on design theories, methods and practices in the field of interaction design with a focus on emerging technology
  • select and implement relevant methods for creative exploration, which include prototyping, communication and iterative processes, for complex design situations based on case studies from specific industrial domains, such as the maritime
  • communicate and present design of novel user interfaces and design solutions by using different methods for conveying engaging experiences

 

GENERAL COMPETENCE

After finishing this course the students will:

  • have a strong understanding of interaction design as an academic and industrial discipline
  • have competence in implementing iterative interaction design processes methods used in research and practice
  • have improved the skills of developing experimental interaction designs
Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The core components of the course are exploration and development of prototypes for different case studies and modules building on the previous one. In addition, reflective and communicational activities in form of reading, writing, seminar discussions, field research and peer assessment will support the students understanding of the practical work. The majority of the student activity will be done in pairs or smaller groups (different pairs/groups for each project), with exception of some of the reflective assignments. The course will consist of several short modules introducing new cases, technologies, methods and aims. Each module will have different forms of presentations, discussions or hand-ins in order to continuously process and share the learning outcomes. Co-learning is an important part of the course, and it is encouraged that the majority of the time is spent working in the class studio in order to develop an inspiring and encouraging environment.

The practical aspects of the course will be complemented by a series of lectures/talks and workshops by a range of practitioners and specialists in the field. The course-modules will involve collaborators and guests with expertise in each case-topic.

Pensum

To be announced later

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
VurderingsmappeIndividuellBestått / ikke bestått Students need to present and submit all projects (3-6) in order to be assessed for the course. All modules must be passed in order to pass the course. Students will be informed at the completion of each project as to wether they have any out standing submissions.

If a student does not submit these deliverables for what ever reason (medical absences etc), he or she can deliver later in the semester, but must deliver before the final project commences (unless they have obtained an extension from administration).

The final project will be graded pass/fail by an external assessor and this results in the grade for the course.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Vurderingsmappe
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar: Students need to present and submit all projects (3-6) in order to be assessed for the course. All modules must be passed in order to pass the course. Students will be informed at the completion of each project as to wether they have any out standing submissions.

If a student does not submit these deliverables for what ever reason (medical absences etc), he or she can deliver later in the semester, but must deliver before the final project commences (unless they have obtained an extension from administration).

The final project will be graded pass/fail by an external assessor and this results in the grade for the course.
AktivitetKommentar
GruppearbeidIf any students have difficulties or conflicts in working within their pair or group, they need to inform the course responsible and we can arrange a solution.
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Gruppearbeid
Kommentar:If any students have difficulties or conflicts in working within their pair or group, they need to inform the course responsible and we can arrange a solution.

70 501 Industridesign 1: Teknoform 1

Full course name in English: 
Industrial Design 1: Technoform
Studiepoeng: 
24
Emnekode: 
70 501
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
24
Emneansvarlig
Steinar Killi
Forkunnskapskrav

Passed foundation level (BA-level) courses at AHO or equivalent, 180 ECTS.

Om emnet

Technoform is an advanced course in industrial design dealing with the interaction between new technology and advanced form generation. The course builds on the legacy of industrial design both in Norway and Scandinavia, aesthetic approaches are explored in a cultural context within a technological frame. This is approached through two extensive iterations. First an incremental viable solution that builds on and refine solutions already available. Then a more radical proposition within the same theme that requires an even more creative and inventive process. The outcome of the course will be physical products.

Læringsutbytte

Knowledge

By the completion of the course the student shall have knowledge about:

  • perform a design process for physical products within to paradigms; as an iteration and through recontextualisation. The first part would typically be an incremental process while the second pursues on a process that aims for more radical innovations.

Skills

By the completion of the course the student shall have the ability to:

  • work and research through new manufacturing trends, that could be the foundation for advanced form-generation
  • to use methods like Peer Creative development, backcasting and possibility driven design
  • sketching, mock up building and CAD are extensively trained during the course

Competence

By the completion of the course the student shall:

  • have increased their tacit competence in performing a design process
  • be able to perform design processes that is not human centered driven
  • be able to utilize form developing methods within a technological frame
Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Workshops, lectures, individual and in groups. Peer feedback is a core method in the course.

Pensum

Curriculum will be presented at the course start and will consist of articles that can be downloaded from the Internet.

VurderingsformGrupperingKarakterskalaKommentar
VurderingsmappeIndividuellBestått / ikke beståttThe course has 2 modules with 2 main deliveries/studio projects. Both modules must be passed in order to pass the course.

If the student fails the first module, it is possible to supplement this before the final assessement.
Vurderinger:
Vurderingsform:Vurderingsmappe
Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:The course has 2 modules with 2 main deliveries/studio projects. Both modules must be passed in order to pass the course.

If the student fails the first module, it is possible to supplement this before the final assessement.
AktivitetKommentar
Oppmøte The semester has an expected high general attendance from the students, particurlarly at lectures and workshops.
Forventet arbeidsinnsats:
Aktivitet:Oppmøte
Kommentar: The semester has an expected high general attendance from the students, particurlarly at lectures and workshops.

Start semester

60 532 IN TRANSIT STUDIO: Dignified reception

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
IN TRANSIT STUDIO: Dignified reception
Emnekode: 
60 532
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
16
Emneansvarlig
Håvard Breivik
Forkunnskapskrav

Passed foundation level courses (bachelor level). Open for master level architecture and landscape architecture students. 

Om emnet

THE IN TRANSIT STUDIO

The In Transit Studio aims at preparing students to conduct their architectural investigations through engaging in current, complex societal topics. Students will develop their design skills by studying and proposing site-specific solutions at a detailed architectonic and neighborhood scale. Through practice-based research, the In Transit Studio aims at developing a deeper understanding of the fundamentals of architecture and to (re-) discover the role of the architect as a societal agent of change.  

The Studio was created in 2016 in partnership with the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC)/NORCAP, a global and independent humanitarian organization that helps people forced to flee. The aim of the studio is to contribute new thinking to the emerging field of displacement management and to educate future built environment professionals, who are ready to take on the challenges of our times. The NRC/NORCAP will be actively involved in the studio course.

INTRODUCTION

Millions of people are now displaced due to war in Europe. This is also a reminder that at least 82.4 million people around the world have been forced to flee their homes (UNHCR). Similar to humanitarian response operations, the tasks and content of this studio course may change throughout the academic semester, according to current events and responding to the shifting situation and needs. First, we do not yet have a fixed site. Second, additional tasks may be added between and during announced project phases. Being flexible and willing to accommodate shifting priorities is a prerequisite for joining this studio. While the studio will be working with real-time challenges, potentially sensitive situations, and partner organizations with specific mandates, the studio will focus on the core of our profession: to provide dignified and safe living conditions for all human beings, including in reception situations. Contributing with our specific skills as built environment experts with well-founded ideas and caring for the ones we design for and with, is a valuable contribution to the situation we are in now, and sought-after skills for the future.

THE EVERYDAY

The topics of everyday life and emergency situations are central to this course. A so-called normal, everyday life is something that should not be taken for granted, especially in the context of contingency planning and displacement management, or in neighborhoods facing social challenges. Functions and places that constitute a high degree of livability depend on – among other things – how we design our surroundings. Livability is a central concept in this course, both in everyday situations and in emergencies.

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

Planning for emergencies is similar to urban planning as it attempts to provide capacities for unknown events. However, while emergency planning can steadily produce new strategies, some measures result in residual urban form, situated somewhere, and being present in people's everyday lives. While the type of crisis cannot be predicted with certainty, the consequences of some can to a certain extent be planned for. Displacement is foremost among these.  

Displacement can mean many different things. The In Transit Studio applies the term quite broadly and refers to internal and temporary displacement due to sudden events. But it can also refer to new arrivals in a new location after having fled conflict and persecution, which is the focus of this semester.

 

THE SEMESTER BRIEF AND SEMESTER STRUCTURE

The semester is divided into four parts. Each part is equally important and together constitute the semester brief.

Part I In search of a site: Mapping

The location of arrival infrastructure facilities – such as reception centers, collective centers, and other functions related to displacement management – will have an impact on its surrounding community, for better or worse. It will also have a critical impact on the health, well-being, and protection of the displaced population, as well as on the ability to manage daily activities, ensure participation and develop relations with the host community. Furthermore, there is currently a discrepancy between solving immediate needs and developing sustainable solutions benefiting the ones fleeing and the communities and environments hosting them. An important part of displacement management is to identify suitable locations for the functions outlined above. In this part of the semester, the studio will be engaged – with partner organizations – in identifying and mapping potential locations for arrival infrastructure. While the areas, plots or structures are yet to be determined, we will work in the Norwegian context.

Part II Sketch project: The practice of everyday life / The common place

In this part, the focus is to transform existing buildings and other structures and activate the surrounding areas into a collection of outdoor and indoor meeting places that allow for cross-cultural encounters.

Through your or your team’s project proposals, you will address fundamental issues of social, spatial, and material justice embedded in the act of design of public spaces in urban contexts. The projects will focus on specific topics such as, but not limited to, gender, age-inclusivity, social visibility and safety. Influenced by notions and methods of ‘Performative Urbanism’ (Wolfrun, 2013), ‘Social Urbanism’ (Echeverri, 2003), ‘Polyvalence’ (Hertzberger, 1991) and ‘Elasticity’ (Hauderowicz & Serena, 2019), you will be expected to imagine innovative spatial interventions challenging the normative and prescriptive character of public spaces today.

Part III Sketch project: In case of emergency / The Collective center

In the third part, the focus is to plan for dignified reception of new arrivals, refugees, and other displaced persons. The brief is to transform existing buildings and other structures into a new type of Collective center that ensures safety and wellbeing of the inhabitants. In humanitarian contexts, collective centers are mostly existing buildings or structures used as temporary accommodation for displaced populations. Collective centers have highly variable life spans. While most collective centers are used only for a couple of days or weeks, in other contexts they may be used for a decade or more. In general, buildings spontaneously occupied or assigned as temporary accommodation are often unfinished, defunct or abandoned, meaning that the quality of the building may have deteriorated since they were last in use or because they were never completed. The program of this part shall include emergency accommodation of new arrivals, but any additional functions are to be determined by you or by each project team.

 

Part IV The detailed project: The hybrid / The Collective city

The detailed project will be a hybrid project of the two sketch projects, with both every day and emergency functions. But in this part, you will also include a third element: other emergency capacities, e.g. facilities ensuring food security, supply storage, or any other function that may be needed in case of an emergency as per preparedness scenarios identified by Norwegian contingency planning entities. The reason why collective centers are rarely purpose-built is in part because of the term idle capital. Few want to invest in buildings that might end up being empty for large parts of their life cycle, without generating income. Norwegian contingency planning agencies also distinguish between reception for new arrivals and for internally displaced persons in case of an emergency domestically - but why? In the detailed project you will explore all this, by combining the two sketch projects and this third element. A possible outcome can be described as follows:

To design a multifunctional neighborhood hub that is a crossover of the Common place and the Collective center program that serves the neighborhood also in case of other types of contingencies. This juxtaposition of constructed, but at times unused emergency structures, and spaces meant for everyday functions, is the output of this part. You will study, invent, and visualize the spatiality of these converging situations, ending up with a hub or center that has everyday programs and emergency accommodation, services, and other contingency planning capacities.

Læringsutbytte

You will gain in-depth insights - and work with real-time challenges related to displacement. You will gain knowledge about global humanitarian responses, the United Nations, International Non-Governmental Organization (NGOs), and national & local authorities responsible for refugee reception and inclusion.

You will learn how to obtain information through fieldwork and self-studies and use this as input to design proposals. You will learn how to engage with real stakeholders and maintain a dialogue with these throughout the project period. You will learn how to explore and develop architectural design for unexpected situations. You will gain insight into real-time, global challenges– and the role of the architect in this context. You will gain knowledge about societal challenges.

Form of assessment

Deliverables throughout - and at the end of the course - shall include imaginative and innovative, yet concrete project proposals with architectural designs that are carefully presented through models, drawings and visualizations. Students are expected to work at both a (strategic) city level and at a detailed architectural scale. Students need to answer all assignments and be present at all presentations to pass the course.  If a student is not able to present his/her/their projects or be present at scheduled reviews, a medical leave note must be submitted. All answered assignments and presentations are subject to an overall assessment, which will be evaluated by external juror(s) and responsible teachers.  

The evaluation of the work will be based on a continual assessment defined by the reviews happening throughout the semester and not solely on the final project and mid-term presentation.  

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Through research and design, the students will develop projects that address social challenges or unforeseen events, while maintaining everyday functions. A big part of the students’ learning process is to research and determine functions and programs needed for each project proposal. This will be based on input provided throughout the course, one of more study trips, and found through self-study and teamwork.

OAT Academy 2022

16-23 September: In Transit Studio students will also represent AHO at the Oslo Architecture Triennale (OAT) ACADEMY International workshop ‘(RE)ACTING / (EN)ACTING - Collective dissidence: reclaiming the neighborhood 

 

Excursions

 Marseille, France.  Subject to change, based on the current situation - we may potentially travel to one or more destinations in Norway in addition or instead.

* * * * *

The history of Marseille has been marked by successive waves of immigration. The social and spatial condition of the city today illustrates the contrast between this important heritage that has impregnated its image and identity, and the deeply contested future plans for the city. The harbor city at the junction between North Africa and the rest of Europe is an island in the middle of the Mediterranean region that is often portrayed as “A city where, the second that one stepped onto the ground, one could say: ‘That’s it. I’m home.’ Marseille belongs to those who live there.”(Izzo, 1995).  

During this week-long study trip, we will visit the historic center of Marseille, the emblematic housing estates that were developed between the 1930s and the 1980s, and ongoing urban planning projects. You will witness first-hand clear ‘architectures of social segregation’ (Barthes & Angelil, 2020) created by limited maintenance and political action regarding social housing policies. We also plan to bring you on visits to local architectural studios and the Marseille Architecture School (ENSAM).

Pensum

Ckick here for reading list in Leganto.

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60 526 Edge Landscape– the role of Park Systems in the contemporary city

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
Edge Landscape– the role of Park Systems in the contemporary city
Emnekode: 
60 526
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
20
Emneansvarlig
Karin Helms
Forkunnskapskrav

Admission to AHO’s Master programme in Architecture or Landscape Architecture. The course is mandatory for Master’s students in Landscape Architecture. Basic knowledges in architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture are is required.  

Om emnet

The aim of the studio course is to explore how to design new landscape typologies at the edge of the city through a quite classic park structure process. The course works to understand the contemporary role of parks in connection to their ground, to the existing urban landscapes and linked to the actual social demand. The studio will explore policies, such as Park systems of the past, green and blue infrastructurn and notions of Edge landscape ( K.Helms 2019) and Landscape as a Prerequisite for the urban (M.Desvigne 2015),

The site will be in the nearby suburban area of Oslo combining a macro perspective and local area development. The purpose of this edge park is to provide a space for recreation, to be productive and pedagogic for shared activities in the local community. The overall objective is to enable the park at large scale to answer to the long-term demand for biodiversity in towns and participate to new mobility axes.

Læringsutbytte

 

Knowledges/ Competences:

Competences in the field of knowledge and understanding, design, analysis and methods, social competences. On completion of this course the student will be able to demonstrate an advanced level of design, based on clear analytical and conceptual thinking at different scales.

The studio presents the students with a theoretical understanding and a framework for assessing and understanding the landscape issues in an urban and suburban context. Learnings of key concepts for designing and evaluating interventions in public spaces and large–scale urban landscapes.

Over the course of the semester we engage in theoretical discussion, focusing on the application of different theoretical perspectives to specific cases.

At a large scale students will learn to:

Understand large scale landscape dynamics.  Learn to observe, investigate  and transcribe landscape data over to mappings. Learn to use geologic and geographic maps and layer notions. Use landscape notions such as Edge Landscape (K.Helms 2019) and Landscape as a Prerequisite for the urban (M.Desvigne 2015).

At a small scale the studio will support the students in developing their landscape architecture general competences in: Understanding the grounding, and soil fertility in towns; Providing the practical and theoretical tools to design and specify the plantation and the initial maintenance of a public space. Simulate over a period the development of a community of plants and understanding the notion of landscape structure.  

Skills

The coursework relies on basic tools, hand drawing and software within landscape design to represent spatial and material conditions. Examples of these are AutoCAD, Adobe package, 3D modelling programs (Rhino), and others. There will be student support to learn these tools if not already acquired.

We will apply various tools for mapping, analysing, and assessing sites, and capture insights about needs, challenges, and opportunities for design. Through the creative group process of integrating insights from mapping into feasible designs, you learn key principles and tools for designing and running creative processes: Both individually and in groups. 

General competence

The course aims to develop the students’ ability to combine and integrate insight about the landscape in a creative process, leading to a specific design, that can convincingly contribute to achieve specific development aims for the area. We do aim to help the students to find their own vision, to be creative.

Graduating from the course, students will have developed awareness of how various aspects and factors affects a specific site, and will be able to describe these factors from a theoretically informed perspective. Using mapping tools, they can derive insights about the specificity of the site, and review those insights in both a theoretical and an applied perspective. Finally, using a conscious creative process, they can integrate theoretical and applied perspectives to device designs that take site specific aspects into account, and make meaningful interventions. 

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The studio is organised around three phases: 

01

  • Group work: Large scale Analyse and diagnosis stage, mapping.  References and big data research with support of methodologic lectures. Study trip: park and garden as well as green infrastructure visits in town and suburban sites of Oslo. Draw while walking!  Evaluation of precedents. Guest lectures. Learnings of digital tools and mapping at large scale. This stage ends with an Interim presentation.    

                                            

02

  • Individual work: Selection on an area within the large-scale study area for scenario development. Elaboration of a clear concept for a comprehensive special design operating at variety of scales base. Design research and visualisation. Tools: Drawings, digital or hand drawing, conceptual models, idea expressed in words.  Theoretical discussions and debate on the role of parks today. This stage ends with an interim presentation.                                                

03

  • Individual work: Work through scales. Small scale design elaboration and details until planting construction. Incidence of the design over to the large scale and back to group work.

Final presentation of the results to experts or target group.

Evaluering og kvalitetssikring

Assessment:   Continuous assessment of practical work throughout the studio time, exercises, intermediate presentations and attendance to the studio will be important for the assessment. 

Pensum

Click here for reading list in Leganto.

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Start semester

60 533 International Studio: Botanical garden in the tropics

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
International Studio: Botanical garden in the tropics
Emnekode: 
60 533
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
16
Emneansvarlig
Luis Callejas
Gro Bonesmo
Forkunnskapskrav

Autocad. Adobe suite. 3d software and advanced model making skills

Om emnet

The first studio in the new international series focuses on the implementation of the techniques and approaches to design developed in the past six years, which allow students to address the design of remote locations by creatively working with constructed site surveys.

 

The techniques developed in the series “Island, Ocean, Mountain, Forest and Desert” are mature enough to confront site specific exercises in contexts and geographies far away from Norway.

 

As in the past, architecture and landscape architecture students are welcomed and encouraged to work together.

 

Tropical botanical garden

 

Botanical gardens have been spaces for advancement of science and education since the earliest examples were built in Europe around the 1500’s, paradigmatic examples such as the botanical garden at the university of Pisa, founded in 1544, or the botanical garden of Padova founded in 1545, were spaces that linked science with contemplation. These early botanical gardens differentiated themselves from old monastic gardens by been mainly focused on the production of new knowledge, not just cultivation and the curated display of plants, they served as the first open air classrooms for the nascent academic field of botany, where some of the earliest professors with full time dedication to botanical sciences required outdoor spaces for research. 

Coinciding with the invention of the botanical garden as institution, European nations with colonies used the botanical gardens as spaces to display, collect and test species brought from the new world. 

As much as the origins of the typology is rooted in scientific discovery, and is linked to some of the earliest academic disciplines focused on botanic studies, it is undeniable that some of the most iconographic aspects of the design of botanical gardens are rooted in the need to exhibit botanical material from locations far away, from completely different climates and cultures, and as such, the evolution of its architecture and garden design has responded to need to display and intensify the perception of what is exotic.

Not much later important botanical gardens in Europe took a turn from science to become depositories for the botanic treasures brought from the colonies.

In Latin America many botanical gardens adopted architectural codes base on their European counterparts, particularly questions of ornamentation, style, layout and museographic identity.  

 

 

Located at 2100 meters above the sea, at 6 degrees of latitude and in the middle of the Andean mountains, the Jardin Botanico of Rionegro will be rather special. First, it will be one of the highest altitude botanical gardens in the world, which together with a stable all year around tropical climate will make it ideal for locating collections outdoors that would normally require interior spaces. The botanical garden will also host the high altitude Andean seed bank, which is the current non public use of the plot occupied by the research branch of the ministry of agriculture. The transformation of this currently closed program into a public space and botanical garden will serve as departure point to a botanical garden close to the original renaissance gardens belonging to universities and the production and safeguarding of botanical knowledge. 

 

Architecture and landscape architecture.

The botanical garden will contain multiple buildings of different scale and use, among them, the most interesting design tasks will be the partially open refrigerated seed banks, a scientific building with an educational program, small greenhouses for tropical plants that require higher temperatures, and other small support structures that will be determined over the development of the course. Architecture students will have the opportunity to focus on individual buildings and reach a sophisticated level of details in their development, while landscape architecture students will be expected to focus more attention on outdoor areas and the open air collections, equally reaching high levels of design details in their proposals. 

 

Ultimately, it is expected that an environment of collaborations between landscape architects and architects will dilute the apparent boundaries between both fields of expertise, something that is particularly possible to aspire in a climate where hard thermal barriers between interiors and exterior areas are not expected nor really needed. 

 

 

Field trip

There will be a trip to Colombia in October during the excursion week. The trip is not mandatory but it is highly recommended. In the trip the students will visit the site, get to know the scientist working on site, and the university and public entities sponsoring the project. We will also visit and stay in the area of El Retiro, twenty minutes from Medellin and close to the botanical garden site. In this area Luis Callejas is developing a small residential masterplan with small houses in the forest. The gardens and architecture will serve as models for the climatic logics of the project to develop in the botanical garden. The cross section of the large 80 hectare plot, ranging from 2100 m to 2500m above the sea will expose students to the species that we will be able to use in the design of the garden. Daily excursions to the mountain will expose students to the full range of plants that belongs to that specific elevation.

Læringsutbytte

Capacity to address different and simultaneous design scales (In architecture and landscape architecture) through the manipulation of the landscape.

 

Capacity to design gardens, outdoor structures and building with shared approaches to geometry and structure

Implementation and formal translation of geographic and cartographic material into concrete design workflows.

Effective translation of botanical and ecological tropes and surveys into geometric principles useful for landscape architecture and architecture

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Model making at diffent scales

Advanced drawing and digital representation

Design discussions and desk critiques in studio

Start semester

60 534 Sustainable small town development

Studiepoeng: 
24
Full course name in English: 
Sustainable small town development
Emnekode: 
60 534
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
16
Emneansvarlig
Andreas Kalstveit
Jørgen Johan Tandberg
Om emnet

 

The course is part of the "Urban Design: Bærekraftig stedsutvikling" course series, a collaboration between the Institute of Urbanism and Landscape and the Institute of Architecture. The studio studies the effect of the "green shift" (det grønne skiftet) on Norwegian architecture and urbanism.

The series envisions sustainable futures for Norwegian towns and rural areas. Projects are developed at several scales, from a strategic, regional level, and into highly detailed architectural proposals. In previous semesters we have developed strategic plans for Flekkefjord, Beitostølen and Gjersrud-Stensrud; in collaboration with local municipalities, developers, OBOS, Ruter, among others.

This semester, we will collaborate with Bane NOR Eiendom, a subsidiary of Bane NOR, the government agency that owns and operates the Norwegian railway network. Bane NOR Eiendom is in possession of all Norwegian railway stations, and is responsible for the development of a large amount of real estate.

 

Læringsutbytte

Knowledge: -Increased knowledge about sustainable construction, detailing and urban planning.

-Ability to analyze the urban fabric of Norwegian small towns, and situate a strategic building project.

-Greater awareness of an architectural project’s impact upon its local context.

-Ability to reflect critically upon the extent of an architectural proposal as an intervention on an urban scale.

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

We will devise viable and sustainable strategies for the future development of an urban area (TBD), in collaboration with Bane NOR and local municipalities.

The course is structured so as to educate “generalists” that are interested in developing a project at all levels: regional strategies, urban plans, building plans and typical details. The output of the course will be both urban plans (overall strategies) and building proposals (exemplary buildings). We will work in phases, from a regional scale to a building detail scale, consulting experts at strategic points throughout the semester.

Field trip to Milano / Como

All students will complete a series of "competition boards" (A1), with the results of the various phases.

Output from the work: Maps, plans, sections, renderings.

Pensum

Click here for reading list in Leganto.

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60 302 Tema og konsepter i landskapsarkitekturen

Studiepoeng: 
6
Full course name in English: 
Themes and Concepts in Landscape Architecture
Emnekode: 
60 302
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
30
Emneansvarlig
Janike Kampevold Larsen
Forkunnskapskrav

The course is mandatory for master students in Landscape Architecture who do not have a background in Landscape Architecture and landscape notions. The course is open students landscape arcitecture and architecture. 

Om emnet

The course will be subdivided in three thematics:

  1. Historical approaches on large-scale urban landscapes methods, knowledge about backgrounds, innovative thinking from the past and transferable approaches to design, 19th and 20th century approaches. Themes on physical and cultural properties for the urban and suburban.

 

  1. Current theoretical and practical approaches in sustainable design for integrated development of ecologic systems, landscape structures, for our contemporary urban and rural landscapes. Notions as “Landscape urbanism”(Charles Waldheim), “Third landscape” ( G. Clement), Landscape as a prerequisite ( M.Desvigne),  as well as current policies as Nature in towns – “Preservation through development” ( D. Sijmons) … will be explored.

 

  1. First approaches on past and current ephemeral gardens and co-design approaches - research oriented perspectives on participatory methods for public spaces and landscape long-term projects, role of the designers in this mode of doing. The social approach in Landscape Architecture is here the main topic.

 

Karin Helms will present a lecture at the start of each “chapter”. Hannes Zander will give three lectures on the historical aspects and landscape notions from the 19th and 20th century. All other lectures are given by teachers from AHO, some lectures will be given by guest lecturer from other schools/ NMBU/EMiLA partners. The students will be asked to give lectures of their understanding of their readings.

Læringsutbytte

 

 

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

Weekly lectures and a self-directed writing exercise. There will be duets working groups after each “chapter”. the working group exercise is a part of the final handle in work.

The course activities include participation in discussions throughout the semester, a written assignment and an oral presentation of the assignment. There will be individual tutorial and group discussions. We are looking for engaged students.

Evaluering og kvalitetssikring

Written assignment, oral presentation of the assignment, and participation in discussions throughout the semester.

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ProsjektoppgaveIndividuellBestått / ikke beståttStudentene skal levere en skriftlig oppgave ved semesterets slutt. De velger ett av temaene det er blitt forelest over, fordyper seg i dette og skriver en oppgave på 4-5 sider. De vil få veiledning i fordypningskursuken. Oppgave leveres 15 november.
Vurderinger:
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Gruppering:Individuell
Karakterskala:Bestått / ikke bestått
Kommentar:Studentene skal levere en skriftlig oppgave ved semesterets slutt. De velger ett av temaene det er blitt forelest over, fordyper seg i dette og skriver en oppgave på 4-5 sider. De vil få veiledning i fordypningskursuken. Oppgave leveres 15 november.

Start semester

80 319 Colour Reflections

Studiepoeng: 
6
Full course name in English: 
Colour Reflections
Emnekode: 
80 319
Studienivå: 
Syklus 2
Undervisningssemester: 
2022 Høst
Eksamenssemester: 
2022 Høst
Undervisningsspråk: 
Norsk/Engelsk
År: 
2022
Maksimum antall studenter: 
12
Emneansvarlig
Ingrid Lønningdal
Forkunnskapskrav

Admission to AHO and successful completion of three years bachelor level studies (180 ECTS).

Om emnet

This course is based on practical work with colour. We will study and discuss colour and space through analogue experiments in sketch models and reliefs. The students will develop their own colour pallets and investigate how colours both influence, and is experienced in, different spatial situations.

During the semester we will approach colour in different ways. We will try out paint mediums like watercolour and gouache, produce material samples with different textures, study colour in three dimensional sketch models, and become acquainted with architects and artists who use colour integrally in their practice.

During the course we will introduce relevant examples to each other, and the students will research themes spanning from colour phenomena and colour relativity to architecture case studies. It is expected that the students contribute actively to the education and be present at every class. The most relevant themes will be decided upon collectively.

Throughout the course the students will become familiar with colour as an architectonic means, in interiors as well as exteriors. It is a goal for the students to accumulate experience, confidence and a vocabulary in using colours. The work will result in each student producing a booklet containing examples, experiments and photos of sketch models. The models and the booklets will be presented in an exhibition at the end of the semester.

Læringsutbytte

On completing the class, the students will have gained:
- an understanding of colour as a spatial means
- practical experience in working with colour
- a better language in describing and discussing colour
- knowledge about some colour theories and terms

Praktisk organisering og arbeidsmåter

The course will consist of both individual studies, presentations and group discussions. The students will need to buy materials (paper, brushes, watercolour, gouache etcetera). Depending on what you already have available, the expenses will be about 1000-2000 NOK.

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